Section Editors

  • Wolfgang Baeumer, NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine
  • Patrick Boerlin, University of Guelph
  • Patrick Butaye, Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre
  • Jose J Ceron, University of Murcia
  • Daniel Horton, University of Surrey
  • Manfred Kietzmann, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover
  • Peter Leegwater, Utrecht University
  • Cheryl London, The Ohio State University
  • Daniel Mills, University of Lincoln
  • Laura Rinaldi, University of Naples Federico II
  • Hans-Hermann Thulke, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ)
  • Holger A Volk, Royal Veterinary College
  • Diana JL Williams, University of Liverpool

Executive Editor

  • Hayley Henderson, BioMed Central

Articles

There has been an error retrieving the data. Please try again.
  • Image attributed to: Wikipedia - Holstein Dairy Cows

    Anthelmintic treatment response in calving dairy cows

    Eprinomectin treatment of dairy cows at calving causes a reduction in gastrointestinal nematode infection and an increase in daily milk yield during the following lactation, which is related to non-invasive parameters, including body condition score.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:264
  • Image attributed to: Flickr Jon Rawlinson

    What is the best treatment for canine epilepsy?

    Oral phenobarbital and imepitoin are amongst likely effective anti-epileptic drugs for the treatment of canine idiopathic epilepsy; however, poor reporting in literature preclude definitive recommendations prompting a need for greater blinded RCTs evaluating the efficacy of these drugs.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:257
  • Image attributed to: Editor's Own Image

    Rough ground for dogs

    Labrador Retrievers adapt their gait pattern and step length to compensate for the discrepancy in apparent leg length caused by cross-slope walking, and such functional musculoskeletal adaptations may be difficult for animals with impaired locomotion.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:241
  • Image attributed to: istock image

    Routine diagnostic test for C. suis in swine herds

    A novel single LNA-based Chlamydia suis-specific probe using real-time PCR, enables direct identification from swabs without requiring sequencing analysis and culturing, and could be used as a routine diagnostic test in pig herds with clinical and subclinical infection.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:225
  • Image attributed to: Authors Own - Figure 1B

    CDV detection in field conditions

    A field-deployable device method, based on one-tube reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction for detection of canine distemper virus (CDV) demonstrates great potential to be used for point-of-care diagnosis and surveillance of CDV in animals, especially in resource-limited facilities.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:213
  • Image attributed to: Authors' Image - Figure 3b

    Accurate tool for the detection of OC lesions

    Optimally timed computed tomography (CT) is an accurate screening tool for articular osteochondrosis (OC) in piglets, and could potentially be used in screening and selection against OC through development of future selection techniques based on genetic screening against heritable OC.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:212
  • Image attributed to: istock image

    Enzyme activity in nasal secretion of cattle

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity in bovine nasal secretion is higher compared to bovine serum, and is produced in the nasal epithelium, raising a number of questions in relation to host protection functions of AP in this fluid.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:204
  • Image attributed to: istock image

    COX-2 inhibitor in canine cancer treatment

    Mavacoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) induces significant cell growth arrest and apoptosis in a panel of canine cancer cell lines, and also inhibits cancer stem cell survival in an in vitro osteosarcoma, highlighting the drug’s potential for canine cancer treatment.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:184
  • Image attributed to: Authors Own Image

    Global spread of infectious canine cancer

    Infectious canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT) is currently endemic in at least 90 countries worldwide including isolated regions, implicating free-roaming dogs as a potential reservoir for the disease, and prompts revision of control measures to reduce CTVT prevalence and spread.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:168
  • Image attributed to: all-puppies.com

    Don't forget your toothbrush

    Without regular oral care, miniature schnauzers can develop early stages of periodontal disease within six months, prompting dog owners to maintain a regular oral care regime, including frequent dental assessments for this breed, and other breeds with similar periodontitis incidence rates.

    BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:166

Featured case reports

Management of a congenital TEF in a young dog

Management of a congenital TEF in a young dog

Contrast material swallow (CS) study using fluoroscopy was the most reliable diagnostic method for the management of a canine congenital tracheosophageal fistula (TEF), unlike bronchoscopy which may allow the fistula to be visualized, but can lead to a false negative result.

BMC Veterinary Research 2014, 10:16
Detecting electrocution in birds of prey

Detecting electrocution in birds of prey

Infrared thermography imaging may be effective for the objective and early detection of electrocuted birds, proving beneficial for examining live animals that require no amputation or cannot be subjected to invasive histopathology.

BMC Veterinary Research 2013, 9:149

Featured review

Creating an equine athlete

Creating an equine athlete

Sebastian McBride and Daniel Mills review the physiological and psychological factors including behavioural modifications that can improve the ability of the performance horse, however, further research is still required to continue improvement of the equine athlete.

BMC Veterinary Research 2012, 8:180

Research in motion

Three-dimensional anatomy of equine incisors

Schrock et al. BMC Veterinary Research 2013, 9:249

View more movies on the BMC-series YouTube channel


Rabies Day
Selected articles from the Eleventh International Equine Colic Research Symposium

Scope

BMC Veterinary Research is an open access, peer-reviewed journal that considers articles on all aspects of veterinary science and medicine, including the epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of medical conditions of domestic, companion, farm and wild animals, as well as the biomedical processes that underlie their health.

BMC Veterinary Research is part of the BMC series which publishes subject-specific journals focused on the needs of individual research communities across all areas of biology and medicine. We offer an efficient, fair and friendly peer review service, and are committed to publishing all sound science, provided that there is some advance in knowledge presented by the work.

BMC series - open, inclusive and trusted.

Call for papers - Schmallenberg Virus Research

BMC Veterinary Research is currently accepting submissions to a thematic issue entitled 'Advances in Schmallenberg Virus Research’ looking at all aspects of this disease and its effects on livestock. Please see the call for papers information page for more details and how to submit.

Section Editor's profile

Patrick Boerlin is currently associate Professor in the Department of Pathobiology at the University of Guelph, Canada.


Dr Boerlin's research activities focus on the molecular epidemiology of bacterial pathogens of animals and of zoonotic agents. In recent years his research focus has been mainly on E. coli and Salmonella from animals, humans, and the environment, but also on some specific Gram-positive pathogens of animals such as Clostridium perfringens and Enterococcus cecorum. A particular emphasis in his laboratory's activities is on antimicrobial resistance and its transfer between bacteria of different origins and ecological compartments.

“Few veterinary journals are freely available to the animal health professions. This essentially limits first hand access to peer-reviewed scientific information in this field to the few who can enjoy costly institutional subscriptions. With its high impact factor in the field of veterinary science, its broad scope, and high quality standards, BMC Veterinary Research is well posed to help fill this gap, and to become a leading journal and important open source of information for people in animal health professions in general. It is also our hope, that, through its open access platform, BMC Veterinary Research can help make the specialized knowledge of veterinary research more widely available to the scientific community at large, thus anchoring it better in the global context of health and biological sciences in general.”

Latest supplements

Volume 10 Suppl 1 (7 July 2014)

Selected articles from the Eleventh International Equine Colic Research Symposium

Proceedings
Dublin, Ireland. 7-10 July 2014

View all supplements

Submit a manuscript Sign up for article alerts Contact us

Email updates

Receive periodic news and updates relating to BioMed Central straight to your inbox.

Indexed by

  • CAS
  • DOAJ
  • Embase
  • MEDLINE
  • PubMed
  • Science Citation Index Expanded
  • Scopus

View all

ISSN: 1746-6148