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Mastitis and milk quality in dairy ruminants

Guest Editors:
Abdelfattah SelimBenha University, Egypt
Fernando Nogueira de SouzaUniversity of São Paulo, Brazil


BMC Veterinary Research called for submissions to our Collection on Mastitis and milk quality in dairy ruminants. Mastitis is a prevalent disease among dairy cows worldwide and poses a significant challenge to the dairy industry. On dairy farms, the disease is still the leading cause of economic loss, and has jeopardized the image of the dairy sector due to its negative implications for animal welfare and public health. 

Meet the Guest Editors

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Abdelfattah SelimBenha University, Egypt

Abdelfattah Selim is a professor of infectious diseases at Benha University in Egypt. He got his MVSc from Benha University in Egypt, and received his PhD from Leipzig University in Germany. He started his research career in 2002 and has published over 83 articles in peer-reviewed international journals, indexed in Scopus. His research focus is veterinary infectious disease and molecular epidemiology of different infectious diseases in domestic animals. He is one of the World Ranking Top 2% Scientists for the year 2021.


Fernando Nogueira de SouzaUniversity of São Paulo, Brazil

Fernando Nogueira de Souza is a veterinarian researcher at the Department of Internal Medicine of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. His primary research interest is to decipher host-pathogen interactions to develop non-antibiotic approaches to combating mastitis in dairy ruminants.

About the collection

BMC Veterinary Research called for submissions to our Collection on mastitis and milk quality in dairy ruminants. Mastitis is a prevalent disease among dairy cows worldwide and poses a significant challenge to the dairy industry. On dairy farms, the disease is still the leading cause of economic loss. Mastitis has also jeopardized the image of the dairy sector due to its negative implications for animal welfare and public health. In support of the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 3: Good Health and Well-being, this Collection aims to gather insights into a wide range of topics related to mastitis and milk quality in dairy ruminants.

We invited submissions of original research articles, study protocols, and narrative reviews that investigate all facets of theoretical, basic, and applied research on mastitis and milk quality. Topics of interest include, but were not limited to:

• Mastitis and milk quality in distinct ruminant species
• Epidemiology and pathogenesis of mastitis
• Innovations in diagnosis and treatment of mastitis
• Management practices to prevent mastitis and improve milk quality
• Impact of mastitis on animal welfare and economic outcomes
• Ruminant mammary gland immunobiology
• Mammary gland and bulk tank milk microbiota
• Somatic cell counts
• Economic impact of mastitis

This Collection provides a platform for researchers to share their work and promote discussions on the prevention and treatment of mastitis, as well as the importance of milk quality in dairy production.


Image credit: Toa55 / Getty Images / iStock

  1. Intramammary infection is the result of invasion and multiplication of microorganisms in the mammary gland and commonly leads to mastitis in dairy animals. Although much has been done to improve cows’ udder he...

    Authors: Silvia Magro, Elena Visentin, Angela Costa, Mauro Penasa, Filippo Cendron, Paolo Moroni, Elena Chiarin, Martino Cassandro, Matteo Santinello and Massimo De Marchi
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:249
  2. Staphylococcus aureus can colonize and infect a variety of animal species. In dairy herds, it is one of the leading causes of mastitis cases. The objective of this study was to characterize the S. aureus isolates...

    Authors: Yacine Titouche, Madjid Akkou, Yasmina Djaoui, Donia Mechoub, Abdelhak Fatihi, Allelen Campaña-Burguet, Pascal Bouchez, Laurence Bouhier, Karim Houali, Carmen Torres, Yacine Nia and Jacques-Antoine Hennekinne
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:247
  3. Acinetobacter lwoffii (A.lwoffii) is a serious zoonotic pathogen that has been identified as a cause of infections such as meningitis, bacteremia and pneumonia. In recent years, the infection rate and detection r...

    Authors: Chengjun Ma, Cui Mei, JingJing Liu, Hui Li, Min Jiao, Huiming Hu, Yang Zhang, Jing Xiong, Yuzhang He, Wei Wei, Hongzao Yang and Hongwei Chen
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:212
  4. In dairy cattle, mastitis causes high financial losses and impairs animal well-being. Genetic selection is used to breed cows with reduced mastitis susceptibility. Techniques such as milk cell flow cytometry m...

    Authors: Katharina Müller-Langhans, Lisa Oberberger, Yury Zablotski, Susanne Engelmann, Martina Hoedemaker, Christa Kühn, Hans-Joachim Schuberth, Holm Zerbe, Wolfram Petzl and Marie Margarete Meyerholz-Wohllebe
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:200
  5. Bovine mastitis is a widespread disease affecting dairy cattle worldwide and it generates substantial losses for dairy farmers. Mastitis may be caused by bacteria, fungi or algae. The most common species isola...

    Authors: Anna Dobrut, Izabela Siemińska, Agnieszka Sroka-Oleksiak, Kamil Drożdż, Joanna Sobońska, Urszula Mroczkowska and Monika Brzychczy-Włoch
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:193
  6. Bovine mastitis is one of the most widespread diseases affecting cattle, leading to significant losses for the dairy industry. Currently, the so-called gold standard in mastitis diagnosis involves determining ...

    Authors: Anna Dobrut, Jakub Skibiński, Adrian Bekier, Kamil Drożdż, Karolina Rudnicka, Przemysław Płociński, Izabela Siemińska and Monika Brzychczy-Włoch
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:169
  7. Buffaloes have the highest potential for production due to a promising gene pool that is being enhanced and upgraded. Mastitis is a significant health impediment that greatly diminishes milk yield and quality,...

    Authors: Abhishek B. Jadhav, Shailesh D. Ingole, Simin V. Bharucha, Korsapati L. Yoshitha, Rajiv V. Gaikwad, Rajesh R. Pharande and Shambhudeo D. Kharde
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:150
  8. The periparturient period in dairy cows is marked by immunosuppression which increases the likelihood of infectious disorders, particularly also mastitis. An in-depth understanding of peripartum leukocyte biol...

    Authors: Ana Cláudia Dumont Oliveira, Carolina Menezes Suassuna de Souza, Eduardo Milton Ramos-Sanchez, Soraia Araújo Diniz, Ewerton de Souza Lima, Maiara Garcia Blagitz, Robson Cavalcante Veras, Marcos Bryan Heinemann, Alice Maria Melville Paiva Della Libera, Sarne De Vliegher, Artur Cezar de Carvalho Fernandes and Fernando Nogueira Souza
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:146
  9. Comprehending the correlation between body conformation traits of cows at the early stages of lactation and prevalent lactation diseases might facilitate the execution of selection and feeding strategies that ...

    Authors: Zhipeng Zhang, Jiayu Yang, Yiyang Yao, Dasheng Wang, Xubin Lu and Zhangping Yang
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:85
  10. Staphylococcus aureus is a multi-host zoonotic pathogen causing human and livestock diseases. Dairy farms that make artisan cheese have distinctive concerns for S. aureus control. Antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) S....

    Authors: Ashma Chakrawarti, Christine L. Casey, Ariela Burk, Robert Mugabi, Amanda Ochoa and John W. Barlow
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2024 20:75
  11. The infection of bovine mammary glands by pathogenic microorganisms not only causes animal distress but also greatly limits the development of the dairy industry and animal husbandry. A deeper understanding of...

    Authors: Xiaojing Xia, Jie Hou, Pengfei Ren, Mingcheng Liu, Lei Wang, Xiaobing Wei, Zhanwei Teng, Oksana Kasianenko, Likun Cheng and Jianhe Hu
    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2023 19:209

Submission Guidelines

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This Collection welcomes submission of original Research Articles. Should you wish to submit a different article type, please read our submission guidelines to confirm that type is accepted by the journal. Articles for this Collection should be submitted via our submission system, Snapp. During the submission process you will be asked whether you are submitting to a Collection, please select "Mastitis and milk quality in dairy ruminants" from the dropdown menu.

Articles will undergo the journal’s standard peer-review process and are subject to all of the journal’s standard policies. Articles will be added to the Collection as they are published.

The Guest Editors have no competing interests with the submissions which they handle through the peer review process. The peer review of any submissions for which the Guest Editors have competing interests is handled by another Editorial Board Member who has no competing interests.