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Supplementary files (Ben Haskell, 14 November 2014)

Should the units in some of the supplementary files be in units of micrograms/ml instead of milligrams/ml? read full comment

Comment on: Alsemari et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14:114

Additional acknowledgement (Nik Soriani Yaacob, 13 November 2014)

We would like to add the following acknowledgement: This study was supported by the Research University Grant, Universiti Sains Malaysia (1001.PPSP.853002), and the Malaysian Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation/IPharm Research Initiative Grant (304.PPSP.6150098). NNNMK was sponsored under the Universiti Sains Malaysia Fellowship Scheme
read full comment

Comment on: Yaacob et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14:252

Unorthodox? (John Hart, 26 September 2014)

I have three questions regarding the paper by McGregor et al, [1] if I... read full comment

Comment on: McGregor et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14:51

Controls? (Richard James Clark, 08 September 2014)

Thank you for this interesting paper.  It would help to know more about the "corresponding bilateral control points".  What locations were used for the control measurements? read full comment

Comment on: Zheng et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14:323

Attention to herbal medicinal use in children is needed. (Hung-Rong Yen, 29 July 2014)

This is an interesting paper published by Dr. Du and colleagues. Indeed, large-scale investigations of herbal medicine usage among children have been lacking. Recently, we have characterized the application of TCM among pediatric patients in Taiwan in 2005 and 2010. (A nationwide population-based study of traditional Chinese medicine usage in children in Taiwan. Huang TP, Liu PH, Lien AS, Yang SL, Chang HH, Yen HR. Complement Ther Med. 2014 Jun;22(3):500-... read full comment

Comment on: Du et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14:218

Docking Study Regarding (Daniel Gomez, 25 July 2014)

The article of Ahmed and co-workers is worthy in its scientific content, however, I have some confusions regarding the parameters used in docking... read full comment

Comment on: Ahmed et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14:155

Response to Lei's comments on "Managing stress and anxiety through qigong exercise in healthy adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials" (Chong-Wen Wang, 27 June 2014)

Dear... read full comment

Comment on: Wang et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14:8

More suitable for a qualitative analysis than a meta-analysis (Guang-Hua Lei, 11 February 2014)

Dear... read full comment

Comment on: Wang et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14:8

Sorry. A mistake. (Andrés Zuno, 03 July 2013)

I speak Spanish and instead of writing CNS I wrote SNC. read full comment

Comment on: Kouakou et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 13:149

The paper and participation of the CNS is forgotten. (Andrés Zuno, 03 July 2013)

The problem is that the paper and participation of the SNC in the immunologic function is forgotten; and the immunologicac system depends on it. The outcome is interpreted from the allopathic chemical point of view. read full comment

Comment on: Kouakou et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 13:149

Misleading title, over-interpretation of findings, other issues (Stephen Gilliver, 25 June 2013)

This paper by Saetung et al. [1], which describes a crossover trial of the effects of Thai massage on biomarkers of bone formation in postmenopausal women, has a number of flaws. Its title, `Thai massage increases biochemical markers of bone formation: a randomized crossover trial,¿ is misleading as Thai massage only showed an effect on one of the tested biomarkers, P1NP. The other biomarkers tested, CTX and osteocalcin, showed no changes in response to Thai massage. Furthermore, whether the observed 7% increase in serum P1NP level is clinically relevant is questionable, especially when one considers that the within-subject coefficient of variation in serum P1NP levels was found in one study [2] to be approximately 12% in a group of postmenopausal... read full comment

Comment on: Saetung et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 13:69

How the work was carried out (Fidele Ntie-Kang, 29 April 2013)

It took us approximately 1 year to collect all data, generate 3D models, carry out analysis and write the paper. read full comment

Comment on: Ntie-Kang et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 13:88

A very useful and thorough study, but ... (Richard James Clark, 29 April 2013)

I can offer two comments to help you avoid future criticism of your... read full comment

Comment on: Lee et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 13:59

wrong word used in conclusion (Todd Hoover, 16 April 2013)

Great article
just a little comment that "wildly" is used in conclusion, should probably be "widely"
although one might hope for both read full comment

Comment on: Zhang et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 13:67

Doomed to prove nothing from the start (Stephen Gordon, 18 February 2013)

I welcome this very apposite critique from Petter Viksveen of the above named paper. The research project the authors set up was very poorly conceived and doomed from the start to prove nothing about homeopathy one way or the other. What is disappointing is that so much time, energy and money went into such a project when it could have been invested in a far better piece of methodology that could have given useful results in a field that needs the investment. read full comment

Comment on: Dean et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 12:167

Homeopathy for mental fatigue ¿ another trial of poor external and model validity (Petter Viksveen, 01 February 2013)

Homeopathy for mental fatigue ¿ another trial of poor external and model... read full comment

Comment on: Dean et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 12:167

Glad to read about this property of Ginger (Sudah Yehuda Kovesh Shaheb, 16 July 2012)

Ginger is used as part of Folk Medicine in many cultures and lately we hear a lot about its anti inflammatory, anti glycating properties.... read full comment

Comment on: Rahnama et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 12:92

Test protocol (Carol Granger, 03 November 2011)

I was dissappointed to read the technique used in this study, and even more so when I read the authors' call for more rabbits to use to repeat in a larger study.
There are a range of other assays that can be used to assess anti-inflammatory activity of substances. These include ex vivo corneas and other tissue culture methods. As scientists, we should all be trying to work towards the three R's: Refine, Reduce, Replace. We shouldn't be doing experiments just because we can, but rather should be doing good meaningful science without unnecessary suffering. read full comment

Comment on: Bashkaran et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 11:90

CAM does not save money (Alexander Aviram, 12 May 2011)

This is clear, but the real proof would be if CAM users were shown to use more medical services AFTER using CAM than before.... read full comment

Comment on: White et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 11:27

Interesting start for a long term study, however.. (Mary Miller, 15 March 2011)

I just wanted to make comment that one feature that seemed to be missing in your publication was discussing the form of onset of Fibromyalgia, as well as years of condition being present at time of study.

Since all persons with Fibromyalgia do not react identically to treatments usually based on type of onset of the condition: accident induced fibromyalgia reacts well to exercise, versus viral inducted fibromyalgia rarely does. The same can also be said of PTSD based Fibromyalgia has its own issues on what treatment works versus the other two known forms, hence Fibromyalgia being referred to as a syndrome rather than from one specific etimology, with same treatment responses.

Since we don't know how your subjects "got Fibromyalgia" nor how long they have suffered from... read full comment

Comment on: Donaldson et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 1:7

"Sham" procedure in this experiment may be not "real" placebo. (Mikhail Glibitsky, 11 January 2011)

If acupoints were illuminated by visible light (red LED) both in "laser" and "sham" experiments, this may question the results of the experiments.

It is well known that red light can be used to influence the acupoints. Looking on Fig. 1, one can see that the skin is illuminated by visible light. If this was true during the experiments, this may mean that authors distinguished not between "true" and "sham" procedures, but between "strong" and "weak" influences. That is, there were no "true placebo" experiments.

From this point of view, it would be better to fix the laser on a support at least 10 cm away from the skin, and do not illuminate the acupoints by visible light at all.

Another source of errors may be the influence of the therapist (i.e. the... read full comment

Comment on: Salih et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 10:81

it's O.K. (Petko Kiriazov, 05 May 2010)

The proposed approach is very good. I have verified it on myself. It works efficiently! read full comment

Comment on: Bock et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 10:14

Potentially misleading patient numbers in Table 2 (Harald Johan Hamre, 17 July 2009)

In Table 2 in this paper, five publications from the AMOS study [1-5] are listed. I am the first author of these publications and would like to point out the following:
In the column "number of patients" 898, 97, 419, 233, and (34+28) patients, respectively, are listed for these five publications. Without further explanation, the reader might think that these are non-overlapping patient samples, which is not the case. The numbers are explained as follows: 898 patients started anthroposophic treatment (eurythmy therapy, art therapy, rhythmical massage therapy or anthroposophic medical therapy) [1] for depression (97 patients) [2], low back pain (34 patients + 28 control patients) [5] and other chronic indications. Of these 898 patients, 419 were referred to eurythmy therapy as primary... read full comment

Comment on: Büssing et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 8:8

Response to Howard Moffet (harry wright, 11 January 2008)

Howard Moffet makes several misleading comments.His first, regarding the necessity, or otherwise, of obtaining a de qi response is covered by the authors in the Background information when they clearly state in the first sentence that 'Acupuncture stimulation elicits deqi, a composite of unique sensations that is essential for clinical efficacy according to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).' They do not indicate their intention to study other non-invasive forms of acupuncture, or indeed any methods which do not rely upon obtaining a de qi response such as Japanese acupuncture, merely TCM acupuncture.The use of an experienced acupuncturist was clearly important for the study and 25 years of clinical experience of acupuncture would, I suggest, equip him to elicit the appropriate de qi... read full comment

Comment on: Hui et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 7:33

The truthiness of deqi (Howard Moffet, 10 December 2007)

Hui et al[1] reported on their investigation into sensations elicited by acupuncture needling which are known as deqi. The authors have previously made significant contributions to our understanding of how the brain responds to acupuncture stimulation.[2] The present study of deqi is motivated by the premise that “this state [sic] is essential for clinical efficacy,”[1] but two years ago, they professed merely that deqi is “related to clinical efficacy.”[2] In fact, there is little evidence for the necessity of deqi, in part because “there is lack of adequate experimental data to indicate what sensations comprise deqi.”[1] Non-invasive forms of acupuncture point stimulation, including acupressure, moxibustion and Toyo Hari acupuncture, are not... read full comment

Comment on: Hui et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 7:33