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Flaws in group selection (Andreas Zourdos, 21 July 2014)

As we can see in the sociodemographic characteristics of the groups of the study, the fasting group is also an almost non smoking group (with only 7% of the group smoking), while the non fasting group is clearly smoking a lot more, with 55% of the group being smokers. Sarri and colleagues are giving the fasting group an unfair advantage on the health markers that they want to study. Smoking can and will affect serum total cholesterol, serum triglycerides, LDL-C level and will lower HDL-C when compared to non smokers (Batic-Mujanovic et al, 2008).  In order to have a fair comparison of two diets, and/or to see if fasting per se does any good, we must create an "all things being equal / ceteris paribus" experiment. The group design is so unequally created that it's impossible to rule out... read full comment

Comment on: Sarri et al. BMC Public Health, 3:16

Change of the author's contact details. (Nigoon Jitthai, 21 July 2014)

Nigoon Jitthai can be reached at njitthai@gmail.com or 32 M. Chuanchuun-Ladpraw, Sukonthasawat Soi 34 Road, Ladpraw, Bangkok 10230, Thailand. read full comment

Comment on: Hickey et al. BMC Public Health, 14:665

Ntshembo Consortium (Catherine Draper, 04 July 2014)

Jointly the Ntshembo Consortium brings extensive knowledge and skill in a range of complementary fields critical to success of this project. In addition to the authors of the paper, the consortium includes: Professor Alan Stein and Dr Paul Ramchandani (University of Oxford; UK); Professor Anneli Ivarsson and Drs Kerstin Edin and John Kinsman (Umea University; Sweden); Professor Linda Adair (University of North Carolina Chapel Hill; USA); and Professor Mark Hanson and Dr Mary Barker (University of Southampton; UK). read full comment

Comment on: Draper et al. BMC Public Health, 14:S5

Claimed racial discrimination in the New Zealand health system; a rebuttal (John Robinson, 12 June 2014)

Claimed racial discrimination in the New Zealand health system; a... read full comment

Comment on: Harris et al. BMC Public Health, 13:844

Errata: Figure 2 (Kerri Viney, 30 May 2014)

Please kindly note that the words "see separate file" should not be included at the end of the title for figure 2. Thank you. read full comment

Comment on: Viney et al. BMC Public Health, 14:467

Acknowledgements (Hanan Alfawaz, 23 April 2014)

The authors are grateful to Dr. Abdulrahman A Al Jumah,consultant Hepatology KAMC and KSAU-HS, NGHA, for his assistance in data collection and data entry. Special thanks go to him for continuous support for the present study read full comment

Comment on: Alfawaz et al. BMC Public Health, 14:159

Erratum: allocation ratio (David Foxcroft, 13 February 2014)

The original paper states a 1:1 allocation ratio between intervention and control arms, which is incorrect. The planned allocation ratio used in the trial was 2:1 intervention:control.  The editorial office have advised that this technical correction is posted as a comment.     read full comment

Comment on: Okulicz-Kozaryn et al. BMC Public Health, 12:319

Mistaken name of Toxoplasmosis Study Group of the Greece-Cyprus Pediatric Surveillance Unit member (Emmanuel Roilides, 11 February 2014)

Instead of Roilidis E the name of the first member of Toxoplasmosis Study Group of the Greece-Cyprus Pediatric Surveillance Unit member is Roilides E read full comment

Comment on: Aptouramani et al. BMC Public Health, 12:1019

Acnknowledgments (Benjamin Crookston, 04 February 2014)

The views expressed in this article are those of the author(s). They are not necessarily those of Young Lives, the University of Oxford, DFID or other funders. read full comment

Comment on: Crookston et al. BMC Public Health, 14:85

Corrigendum (Sonja Merten, 10 January 2014)

The authors have noted that Figure 1 Perceived caused of cholera (%) is erroneous when the manuscript had already gone to the final publication production queue and a replacement of the Figure was not be possible at that stage. The correct results for the category most important in Figure 1 are: Drinking contaminated water 36.4, Contaminated food 12.8, Dirty environment 16.1, Lack of latrines 14.4, Flies 4.7, Not washing hands 3.6, Contact with contaminated water 1.4, Gods will 1.9, Witchcraft 3.3, Eating soil 0.3, Worms 0.3, Malaria 0.3, Violation of taboo 0.3, Forbiden food 0.3. The categories spontaneous and probed are not affected and the interpretation of the results remains unchanged. read full comment

Comment on: Merten et al. BMC Public Health, 13:60

Correction of endnote 'a' (Nicole Rosenkotter, 08 January 2014)

Since the publication of our article we have noticed an error in endnote 'a' for which the corresponding author accepts full responsibility. The endnote 'a' should state: Also the majority of EU member states disconnected on national level the Ministry of Health from Social Affairs. Examples of countries with a combined ministry at the time of writing are Estonia, Finland, France, and Sweden. read full comment

Comment on: Rosenkötter et al. BMC Public Health, 13:1074

Author Address Change (Zahra Fazli Khalaf, 06 December 2013)

Author affiliation: Behzad Ghorbani: Reproductive Biotechnology Research Center, Avicenna Research Institute, ACECR, Tehran, Iran. Email: B.Ghorbani@avicenna.ac.ir   read full comment

Comment on: Fazli Khalaf et al. BMC Public Health, 13:1062

Reference 10 correction (Wim Vanden Berghe, 31 October 2013)

Reference 10 refers to a conference abstract, not a journal article.

The reference should be:

Fernández Dávila P, Folch C, Ferrer L, Casabona J, Hickson F, Amut A, Weatherburn P, Schmidt AJ, the EMIS network. Mobile men who have sex with men: An exploration in European residents of sexual risk taking while travelling abroad. Abstract presented at XIX International AIDS conference, July 22-27, Washington DC (abstract number: THPE373).
Available in: http://pag.aids2012.org/EPosterHandler.axd?aid=15867 read full comment

Comment on: Vanden Berghe et al. BMC Public Health, 13:968

Response to: Rikkers et al. Trends in sugar supply and consumption in Australia: is there an Australian Paradox? (Tom McNeill, 28 October 2013)

Response... read full comment

Comment on: Rikkers et al. BMC Public Health, 13:668

Changed contact details (Muhammad Umair Mushtaq, 24 September 2013)

Please note that my email address is:
mushtaqmu@gmail.com read full comment

Comment on: Mushtaq et al. BMC Public Health, 10:60

Productivity Loss and the Economic Evaluation of Public Health Initiatives (Tina Olsson, 18 July 2013)

I was interested to read this recent research protocol describing an upcoming economic evaluation of Multisystemic Therapy or MST in the Netherlands [1] as I myself have advocated for the increased use of economic evaluation within public health [2, 3]. To date, comparatively little attention has been paid in the literature to the economic outcomes of behavioral health initiatives such as MST although the expansion of this line of research has clear promise for advancing the discipline... read full comment

Comment on: Jansen et al. BMC Public Health, 13:369

Biomass comparison - have we 'filled' the earth, yet? (Robert Dye, 18 July 2013)

Type your comment here...
How does the total biomass of the human species compare with that of any other species, terrestrial or marine?

The figure stated was for the 2005 census. Would it be appropriate to scale it up to the over 7 billion now living? read full comment

Comment on: Walpole et al. BMC Public Health, 12:439

Promising traffic crash prevention technologies (Ediriweera Desapriya, 14 May 2013)

I would agree with the authors and it may be driver¿s lack of awareness about appropriate use that would partly explain and hinder effectiveness of ABS. In addition, drivers may over rely on these promising crash prevention technologies and take some additional risks while driving to compensate the added safety value to the vehicles. However, Anti Lock Brakes (ABS) has been shown effective in reducing motor cycle crashes (Teoh, 2010). Fatal crashes are 37 per cent lower for motorcycles equipped with optional ABS than for those same models without ABS. Similarly, insurance claims for ABS equipped motor cycles are 22 per cent less than for motorcycles without ABS. In fact, European Union declared that ABS will be mandatory for new models above 125 cc from 2016. It will be mandatory for all EU... read full comment

Comment on: Khorasani-Zavareh et al. BMC Public Health, 13:439

Inaccurate citation (Christian Schaetti, 10 April 2013)

This is in reference to the following sentence on page 14, right column: "HCWs¿ perceptions of vaccines and of vaccine preventable diseases may be different in developing countries because they face different disease burdens, and this is the reason why these studies were not included [35,36]." I would like to point out that in the study you cited (No. 36: Schaetti C et al., PLoS ONE 2012;7(7):e41527) we did not study health care workers' perceptions in Zanzibar; we interviewed the general community instead.
C. Schaetti read full comment

Comment on: Herzog et al. BMC Public Health, 13:154

Correction -- Task Force Affiliation (Thomas Niederkrotenthaler, 10 April 2013)

We have falsely reported that all members from the Societal Impact Task Force are affiliated with the Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna. Task force member Prof. Dr. Veronika Fialka-Moser is the Head of Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and was not affiliated with the Center for Public Health at the time of publication. The task force was composed of members from The Center for Public Health and the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Medical University of Vienna).
For the authors: Dr. Thomas Niederkrotenthaler read full comment

Comment on: Niederkrotenthaler et al. BMC Public Health, 11:588

Are deprivation quintiles actually comparing like-with-like? (Karen Tocque, 10 March 2013)

This is a very interesting study which has the potential to add evidence to the debate about the extent to which water fluoridation and deprivation influence dental health. However, I query whether the measure of deprivation used in this paper, which asserts to compare social deprivation across the two cities, is actually comparing like-with -like. I have many years of experience of applying national quintiles of deprivation to ecological analyses such as... read full comment

Comment on: McGrady et al. BMC Public Health, 12:1122

Efforts to quantify the magnitude of inequalities must consider more carefully the implications of the patterns by which measures tend to be affected by the prevalence of an outcome. (James Scanlan, 10 March 2013)

As very few others have done, Scholes et al.[1] importantly recognize certain patterns by which relative and absolute differences between outcome rates tend to be systematically affected by the prevalence of an outcome. But they overlook that there are two relative differences (one in the favorable outcome and the other in the opposite, adverse outcome) and that two tend to change in opposite direction as the prevalence of an outcome changes. They also fail to recognize the implications of patterns by which measure are affected by the prevalence of an outcome with respect to efforts to determine whether the forces causing outcome rates to differ have increased or decreased over time.... read full comment

Comment on: Scholes et al. BMC Public Health, 12:129

Inequality plus raising the standard of living? (Matt Owens, 10 March 2013)

This is a thoughtful article with an interesting methodology. To me it underscores the progress that can be made on MDG5 through the reduction of inequality but also via general increases in the wealth of all nations. So for example, in the Chilean case maternal education served as a proxy for higher standard of living and access to proper medical care and acted to moderate the MMR. In addition, factors such as clean water and sanitary sewerage were also related to a reduction in MMR. Chile has recently joined the club of wealthier nations (OECD)which is a reflection of their economic growth (they are also a... read full comment

Comment on: Ruhago et al. BMC Public Health, 12:1119

Hispanic-Americans have skin pigmentation well suited to solar UV in the United States (William B. Grant, 10 March 2013)

The paper by Coups et al. [1] suggests that Hispanics in the United States should be more concerned about protecting themselves from solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance even though they have one-seventh the incidence of skin cancer as white non-Hispanic Americans. Unfortunately, this paper focuses on one very minor adverse health risk for Hispanics without putting this risk in the context of overall health. Solar UVB is the primary source of vitamin D for most Americans [2], and vitamin D has many health benefits [3,4]. Hispanic Americans have lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations than white non-Hispanic Americans [5] due to darker skin pigmentation. Skin pigmentation adapts to where a people live for a millennium or longer, dark enough to reduce folate destruction, free... read full comment

Comment on: Coups et al. BMC Public Health, 12:985

Selection Bias in retrospective DMP-evaluation (Andreas Sonnichsen, 10 March 2013)

Unfortunately the study of Ostermann et al only adds to the montain of literature on disease management evaluation without conveying any additional information. As many authors before them, Ostermann et al come to the conclusion that we need randomized controlled trials to really prove the effectiveness of a DMP. Surprisingly the authors neither cite nore discuss the RCTs and metaanalyses that already exist on the... read full comment

Comment on: Ostermann et al. BMC Public Health, 12:490