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Open Access Research article

Dapagliflozin add-on to metformin in type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 102-week trial

Clifford J Bailey1*, Jorge L Gross2, Delphine Hennicken3, Nayyar Iqbal4, Traci A Mansfield4 and James F List4

Author affiliations

1 Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK

2 Endocrine Division, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Paulo Gama 110-Reitoria, Porto Alegre, 90040-060, Brazil

3 Global Biometric Services, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Parc de l'Alliance, Avenue de Finlande 4, Braine I'Alleud, B-1420, Belgium

4 Global Clinical Research, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Route 206 & Province Line Road, Princeton, New Jersey, 08543, USA

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Citation and License

BMC Medicine 2013, 11:43  doi:10.1186/1741-7015-11-43

Published: 20 February 2013

Abstract

Background

Management of type 2 diabetes with metformin often does not provide adequate glycemic control, thereby necessitating add-on treatment. In a 24-week clinical trial, dapagliflozin, an investigational sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, improved glycemic control in patients inadequately controlled with metformin. The present study is an extension that was undertaken to evaluate dapagliflozin as long-term therapy in this population.

Methods

This was a long-term extension (total 102 weeks) of a 24-week phase 3, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group trial. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) to blinded daily treatment (placebo, or dapagliflozin 2.5 to 5, or 10 mg) plus open-label metformin (≥1,500 mg). The previously published primary endpoint was change from baseline in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at 24 weeks. This paper reports the follow-up to week 102, with analysis of covariance model performed at 24 weeks with last observation carried forward; a repeated measures analysis was utilized to evaluate changes from baseline in HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and weight.

Results

A total of 546 patients were randomized to 1 of the 4 treatments. The completion rate for the 78-week double-blind extension period was lower for the placebo group (63.5%) than for the dapagliflozin groups (68.3% to 79.8%). At week 102, mean changes from baseline HbA1c (8.06%) were +0.02% for placebo compared with -0.48% (P = 0.0008), -0.58% (P <0.0001), and -0.78% (P <0.0001) for dapagliflozin 2.5 to 5, and 10 mg, respectively. In addition, all dapagliflozin groups had sustained reductions from baseline in FPG (-1.07 to -1.47 mmol/l) and body weight (-1.10 to -1.74 kg) at 102 weeks, whereas increases were noted in placebo-treated patients for both of these outcomes. Events of hypoglycemia were rare and were not severe. Evidence suggestive of genital infection was reported in 11.7% to 14.6% of dapagliflozin patients and 5.1% of placebo patients, with one related discontinuation (dapagliflozin 5 mg). Evidence suggestive of urinary tract infection was reported in 8.0% to 13.3% of dapagliflozin patients and 8.0% of placebo patients, with one related discontinuation (dapagliflozin 2.5 mg).

Conclusions

Dapagliflozin added to metformin for 102 weeks enabled sustained reductions in HbA1c, FPG, and weight without increased risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes who were inadequately controlled on metformin alone.

Trial registration

ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00528879

Keywords:
Dapagliflozin; metformin; SGLT2; sodium-glucose cotransporter 2; glycemic control; type 2 diabetes