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Open Access Research article

A meta-analysis of the association between gestational diabetes mellitus and chronic hepatitis B infection during pregnancy

Dechuan Kong12, Haiyan Liu3, Shan Wei12, Yan Wang4, Anqun Hu3, Wenhui Han4, Naiqing Zhao5, Yihan Lu12* and Yingjie Zheng126*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China

2 The Key Laboratory on Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China

3 Department of Clinical Laboratory, Anqing City Hospital, Anqing 246003, Anhui Province, China

4 Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Anqing City Hospital, Anqing 246003, Anhui Province, China

5 Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China

6 Department of Sanitary Microbiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China

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BMC Research Notes 2014, 7:139  doi:10.1186/1756-0500-7-139

Published: 11 March 2014

Abstract

Background

Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection during pregnancy is associated with insulin resistance. A meta-analytic technique was used to quantify the evidence of an association between CHB infection and the risk of gestational diabetes (GDM) among pregnant women.

Methods

We searched PubMed for studies up to September 5th 2013. Additional studies were obtained from other sources. We selected studies using a cohort-study design and reported a quantitative association between CHB infection during pregnancy and risk of GDM. A total of 280 articles were identified, of which fourteen publications involving 439,514 subjects met the inclusion criteria. A sequential algorithm was used to reduce between-study heterogeneity, and further meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effects model.

Results

Ten out of the fourteen studies were highly homogeneous, indicating an association of 1.11 [the adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval 0.96 - 1.28] between CHB infection during pregnancy and the risk of developing GDM. The heterogeneity of the additional four studies may be due to selection bias or possible aetiological differences for special subsets of pregnant women.

Conclusions

These results indicate that CHB infection during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of developing GDM among pregnant women except those from Iran.

Keywords:
Chronic hepatitis B infection; Gestational diabetes mellitus; Pregnant women; Meta-analysis