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Open Access Short Report

Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among HIV seropositive patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana

Yaw Agyekum Boaitey1, Bernard Nkrumah2*, Ali Idriss3 and Samuel Crowther Kofi Tay4

Author Affiliations

1 Microbiology Department, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana

2 Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine, Kumasi, Ghana

3 Malaria Research Centre, Agogo, Asante Akim North, Ghana

4 Microbiology Department, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

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BMC Research Notes 2012, 5:454  doi:10.1186/1756-0500-5-454

Published: 21 August 2012

Abstract

Background

Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections are aggravating the incidence and progression of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection into Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) more especially in the developing countries. This study was conducted to assess the common gastrointestinal and urinary infections among HIV/AIDS patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Ghana between April and December 2008.

Findings

This work reports on gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among 500 HIV seropositive and 300 HIV seronegative patients. There was a 35% (175/500) prevalence of intestinal parasites among HIV seropositive patients compared to 4.3% (13/300) in HIV seronegative patients. Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium accounted for 19% (95/500) and 14% (70/500) respectively, while Schistosoma mansoni, Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm together accounted for 2% (10/500) of intestinal parasitic infections among the HIV seropositive patients. There was no significant difference (pā€‰>ā€‰0.05) in urinary parasitic infection between HIV seropositive 1% (2/500) and seronegative patients 0.7% (2/300). Most, 60 (86%) out of 70, of the urinary tract infection among the HIV seropositive patients was due to bacteria with E. coli being the most predominant isolate, 28 (47%) out of 60. There was no significant difference in infections based on age and gender.

Conclusion

G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium were the most common gastrointestinal parasites detected while bacteria accounted for majority of the urinary tract infections among the HIV seropositive patients at the hospital.

Keywords:
HIV/AIDS; Giardia lamblia; Cryptosporidium; Parasitic infection