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Open Access Research article

Genetic predisposition, parity, age at first childbirth and risk for breast cancer

Salma Butt1*, Sophia Harlid23, Signe Borgquist4, Malin Ivarsson23, Göran Landberg5, Joakim Dillner26, Joyce Carlson37 and Jonas Manjer89

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden

2 Department of Medical Microbiology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden

3 Department of Clinical Chemistry, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden

4 Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden

5 Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Unit, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester University, Manchester, UK

6 Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Medical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden

7 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Skåne University Hospital Lund, Lund, Sweden

8 Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden

9 The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden

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BMC Research Notes 2012, 5:414  doi:10.1186/1756-0500-5-414

Published: 7 August 2012

Abstract

Background

Recent studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of breast cancer and parity and age at first childbirth are well established and important risk factors for breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between these environmental factors and genetic variants on breast cancer risk.

Methods

The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS) included 17 035 female participants, from which 728 incident breast cancer cases were matched to 1448 controls. The associations between 14 SNPs and breast cancer risk were investigated in different strata of parity and age at first childbirth. A logistic regression analysis for the per allele risk, adjusted for potential confounders yielded odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results

Six of the previously identified SNPs showed a statistically significant association with breast cancer risk: rs2981582 (FGFR2), rs3803662 (TNRC9), rs12443621 (TNRC9), rs889312 (MAP3K1), rs3817198 (LSP1) and rs2107425 (H19). We could not find any statistically significant interaction between the effects of tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth on breast cancer risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons.

Conclusions

The results of this study are in agreement with previous studies of null interactions between tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth with regard to breast cancer risk.