Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Research Notes and BioMed Central.

Open Access Short Report

Nogo-B is associated with cytoskeletal structures in human monocyte-derived macrophages

Kathrin Schanda1, Martin Hermann2, Nadia Stefanova1, Viktoria Gredler1, Christine Bandtlow3 and Markus Reindl1*

Author Affiliations

1 Clinical Department of Neurology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria

2 KMT Laboratory, Department of Visceral-, Transplant- and Thoracic Surgery, Center of Operative Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria

3 Department of Neurobiochemistry, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Research Notes 2011, 4:6  doi:10.1186/1756-0500-4-6

Published: 14 January 2011

Abstract

Background

The reticulon Nogo-B participates in cellular and immunological processes in murine macrophages. Since leukocytes are an essential part of the immune system in health and disease, we decided to investigate the expression of Nogo-A, Nogo-B and Nogo-C in different human immune cell subpopulations. Furthermore, we analyzed the localization of Nogo-B in human monocyte-derived macrophages by indirect immunofluorescence stainings to gain further insight into its possible function.

Findings

We describe an association of Nogo-B with cytoskeletal structures and the base of filopodia, but not with focal or podosomal adhesion sites of monocyte-derived macrophages. Nogo-B positive structures are partially co-localized with RhoA staining and Rac1 positive membrane ruffles. Furthermore, Nogo-B is associated with the tubulin network, but not accumulated in the Golgi region. Although Nogo-B is present in the endoplasmic reticulum, it can also be translocated to large cell protrusions or the trailing end of migratory cells, where it is homogenously distributed.

Conclusions

Two different Nogo-B staining patterns can be distinguished in macrophages: firstly we observed ER-independent Nogo-B localization in cell protrusions and at the trailing end of migrating cells. Secondly, the localization of Nogo-B in actin/RhoA/Rac1 positive regions supports an influence on cytoskeletal organization. To our knowledge this is the first report on Nogo-B expression at the base of filopodia, thus providing further insight into the distribution of this protein.