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Needlestick and sharps injuries among health care workers at public tertiary hospitals in an urban community in Mongolia

Mayo Kakizaki1, Nayu Ikeda2*, Moazzam Ali3, Budbazar Enkhtuya4, Muugolog Tsolmon5, Kenji Shibuya2 and Chushi Kuroiwa6

Author Affiliations

1 NTT Communications Corporation, Tokyo, Japan

2 Department of Global Health Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

3 Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland

4 Department of Immunization, National Center of Communicable Diseases, Ministry of Health, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

5 Research and Development Division, National Center of Communicable Diseases, Ministry of Health, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

6 Yotsukaido Tokushukai Medical Center, Chiba, Japan

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BMC Research Notes 2011, 4:184  doi:10.1186/1756-0500-4-184

Published: 14 June 2011

Abstract

Background

Needlestick and sharps injuries (NSSIs) are one of the major risk factors for blood-borne infections at healthcare facilities. This study examines the current situation of NSSIs among health care workers at public tertiary hospitals in an urban community in Mongolia and explores strategies for the prevention of these injuries.

Findings

A survey of 621 health care workers was undertaken in two public tertiary hospitals in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, in July 2006. A semi-structured and self-administered questionnaire was distributed to study injection practices and the occurrence of NSSIs. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate factors associated with experiencing NSSIs. Among the 435 healthcare workers who returned a completed questionnaire, the incidence of NSSIs during the previous 3 months was 38.4%. Health care workers were more likely to report NSSIs if they worked longer than 35 hours per week (odds ratio, OR: 2.47; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.31-4.66) and administered more than 10 injections per day (OR: 4.76; 95% CI: 1.97-11.49). The likelihood of self-reporting NSSIs significantly decreased if health care workers adhered to universal precautions (OR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.17-0.68).

Conclusions

NSSIs are a common public health problem at public tertiary hospitals in Mongolia. The promotion of adequate working conditions, elimination of excessive injection use, and adherence to universal precautions will be important for the future control of potential infections with blood-borne pathogens due to occupational exposures to sharps in this setting.

Keywords:
needlestick and sharps injuries; infection control; blood-borne pathogens; universal precautions; Mongolia