Open Access Short Report

Replacing the wild type loxP site in BACs from the public domain with lox66 using a lox66 transposon

Pradeep K Chatterjee12*, Leighcraft A Shakes12, Naima Stennett23, Vanessa L Richardson23, Tennison L Malcolm12 and Ken R Harewood23

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Chemistry, North Carolina Central University, 1801 Fayetteville Street, Durham, NC 27707, USA

2 Julius L Chambers Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute, North Carolina Central University, 1801 Fayetteville Street, Durham, NC 27707, USA

3 Department of Biology, North Carolina Central University, 1801 Fayetteville Street, Durham, NC 27707, USA

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BMC Research Notes 2010, 3:38  doi:10.1186/1756-0500-3-38

Published: 19 February 2010

Abstract

Background

Chromatin adjoining the site of integration of a transgene affects expression and renders comparisons of closely related transgenes, such as those derived from a BAC deletion series retrofitted with enhancer-traps, unreliable. Gene targeting to a pre-determined site on the chromosome is likely to alleviate the problem.

Findings

A general procedure to replace the loxP site located at one end of genomic DNA inserts in BACs with lox66 is described. Truncating insert DNA from the loxP end with a Tn10 transposon carrying a lox66 site simultaneously substitutes the loxP with a lox66 sequence. The replacement occurs with high stringency, and the procedure should be applicable to all BACs in the public domain. Cre recombination of loxP with lox66 or lox71 was found to be as efficient as another loxP site during phage P1 transduction of small plasmids containing those sites. However the end-deletion of insert DNA in BACs using a lox66 transposon occurred at no more than 20% the efficiency observed with a loxP transposon. Differences in the ability of Cre protein available at different stages of the P1 life cycle to recombine identical versus non-identical lox-sites is likely responsible for this discrepancy. A possible mechanism to explain these findings is discussed.

Conclusions

The loxP/lox66 replacement procedure should allow targeting BACs to a pre-positioned lox71 site in zebrafish chromosomes; a system where homologous recombination-mediated "knock-in" technology is unavailable.