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This article is part of the supplement: International Conference on Prevention & Infection Control (ICPIC 2011)

Open Access Poster presentation

Laboratory-confirmed pandemic H1N1 influenca in hospitalized adults – findings from the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP), 2009-10

G Taylor1*, K Wilkinson2, D Gravel2, B Amihod3, C Frenette4, D Moore4, A McGeer5, K Suh6, A Wong7, R Mitchell2 and Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program

  • * Corresponding author: G Taylor

Author Affiliations

1 Univesity of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

2 Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada

3 Jewish General Hospital, Canada

4 McGill University, Montreal, Canada

5 University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

6 University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada

7 University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada

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BMC Proceedings 2011, 5(Suppl 6):P81  doi:10.1186/1753-6561-5-S6-P81

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1753-6561/5/S6/P81


Published:29 June 2011

© 2011 Taylor et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Introduction / objectives

To describe laboratory-confirmed pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza in adult inpatients at participating Canadian hospitals between June 2009 and May 2010 and compare to previous years’ seasonal surveillance.

Methods

Adult inpatients (>=16 years) with lab confirmed influenza were enrolled. Variables collected included ICU admissions and death attributed to influenza assessed 30 days after initial diagnosis.

Results

Results

Thirty-seven hospitals submitted data on 701 cases. The median age of was 49 years (range 16 - 94). Vaccine history was available for 314 cases, and 21% (n=65) reported receiving vaccine. Oseltamivir was given to 90% of the cases a median of 3 days after symptom onset (range 0 - 24). Influenza-associated admission to ICU was required for 28% (n=197). The 30 day all-cause mortality was 7%; influenza was the primary cause of 20 deaths and contributed to death in a further 22 cases for an influenza-attributed mortality of 6%. The mean age at death was 50 years (SD 13.8).

Conclusion

The ICU admission rate and influenza-attributed mortality were similar to three preceding influenza years, but mean age at death was significantly younger (p<0.01). Antivirals were prescribed for more patients with influenza (90%) than in previous seasons (35-47%). The pH1N1 virus appeared outside the traditional influenza season and impacted a different age group than seasonal viruses circulating in previous years, highlighting the importance of ongoing influenza surveillance.

Disclosure of interest

None declared.