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This article is part of the supplement: International Conference on Prevention & Infection Control (ICPIC 2011)

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McCabe score as a strong determinant of septic shock-related mortality

F Delodder*, Y-A Que, J-P Revelly, P Eggimann and the Staff of the Service of Adult Intensive Care Medicine (SMIA)

  • * Corresponding author: F Delodder

Author Affiliations

Intensive Care Medicine, CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland

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BMC Proceedings 2011, 5(Suppl 6):P74  doi:10.1186/1753-6561-5-S6-P74

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at:

Published:29 June 2011

© 2011 Delodder et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Introduction / objectives

Septic shock is associated with a high mortality. However, we suspected that hospital mortality may be influenced by the predicted outcome of comorbidities and by the origin of the infection


We analysed hospital-related mortality of all patients with a septic shock consecutively admitted in our 32-beds mixed university ICU from 2005 to 2008, according to both the origin (community-acquired or nosocomial) and to the underlying McCabe and Johnson score (non fatal, fatal within 5 years, fatal within 6 months). Data are extracted from the clinical information system and combined with a database on case-mix used Following discharge, diagnostic are prospectively validated by the attending physician and further imported in the institution datawarehouse after final crosschecking


A total of 8979 patients, accounting for 9641 stays were admitted from January 2005 to December 2008. A septic shock was diagnosed in 910 cases, community-acquired and nosocomial in 551 and 358 cases (39.3%), respectively. The McCabe score was nonfatal, fatal within 5 years and fatal within 6 months, in 44.6%, 38.5% and 16.9% of stays, respectively. Overall hospital mortality was 37.0%, 31.1% and 46.0% for all episodes, for community-acquired and nosocomial septic shock, respectively. It was 23.9%, 36.9% and 73.1% for McCabe nonfatal, fatal within 5 years and fatal within 6 months, respectively. Mortality decreased significantly from 73% if nosocomial in patients with an underlying condition scored as potentially fatal within the next 6 months to 20% when community-acquired in a patient with non fatal underlying disease


The McCabe/Johnson score and the origin (community-acquired or nosocomial) are strong determinant of the outcome of septic shock

Disclosure of interest

None declared.