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This article is part of the supplement: International Conference on Prevention & Infection Control (ICPIC 2011)

Open Access Poster presentation

Distribution of carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ESBL-producing organisms colonization among intensive care patients

P Santanirand1*, K Malathum2, T Chadlane1 and W Laolerd1

  • * Corresponding author: P Santanirand

Author Affiliations

1 Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

2 Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

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BMC Proceedings 2011, 5(Suppl 6):P293  doi:10.1186/1753-6561-5-S6-P293


The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1753-6561/5/S6/P293


Published:29 June 2011

© 2011 Santanirand et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Introduction / objectives

Infection with carbapenem resistant A. baumannii (CR-AB)and P. aeruginosa (CR-PS) as well as ESBL-producing organisms have caused high rate of mortality. This project was aimed to survey the prevalence of drug resistant organisms colonization in critical care patients as a part of infection control program.

Methods

Perianal swab, urine (from Foley’s catheter) and endotracheal catheter (ET) were collected from patients who were admitted to intensive care units of a 1000-bed hospital. Isolation of CR-AB and CR-PS was using EMB agar containing 12 ug/ml of either imipenem or meropenem. The MacConkey agar containing 1 ug/ml of cefotaxime was used for screening of ESBL-producing organisms. The MIC of these organisms was performed using THANF customised panel (Sensititre, UK).

Results

A total of 81 isolates was detected from 39 patients. There were 53, 22 and 6 isolates of ESBL-producing organisms, CR-AB and CR-PS, respectively. Perianal was found to be the most common site for colonisation with ESBL-producing organisms (45/60 isolates) while 8 of 14 isolates from ET were CR-AB. All CR-AB isolates resisted to nearly all tested antibiotics. However, all isolates were susceptible to colistin and tigecycline with the MIC90 at ≤1 and 1 ug/ml, respectively. In contrast, the ESBL-producing organisms remained susceptible to all tested carbapenems. Nevertheless, 68% of these isolates resisted to fluoroquinolones.

Conclusion

This project is a part of implementation of hospital-acquired infection control policy. The data demonstrated the existing of various multiple-drugs resistant organisms in critical care patients which would be a challenging task for infectious control.

Disclosure of interest

None declared.