Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Medicine and BioMed Central.

Journal App

google play app store
Open Access Research article

IL-10, IL-6 and CD14 polymorphisms and sepsis outcome in ventilated very low birth weight infants

R John Baier1*, John Loggins2 and Krishna Yanamandra2

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Pediatrics University of Manitoba WR 116 735 Notre Dame Avenue Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 0L8, Canada

2 Department of Pediatrics Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center 1501 Kings Highway Shreveport, Louisiana 71130-3932, USA

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Medicine 2006, 4:10  doi:10.1186/1741-7015-4-10

Published: 12 April 2006

Abstract

Background

Genetic variation in the innate immune system of the host may play a role in determining the risk of developing infection, as well as outcome from infection.

Methods

Infectious complications were retrospectively determined in 293 (233 African-American (AA), 57 Caucasian and 3 Hispanic) mechanically ventilated very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (<1500 grams at birth) who were genotyped for the IL-6 -174 G/C, IL-10 -1082 G/A and CD14 -260 C/T single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

Results

The IL-6 -174C allele was associated with an increased incidence of late blood stream infection (BSI) in AA but not Caucasian infants. In AA infants with the C allele the incidence of late BSI was 20/29 (69%) compared to 94/204 (46%) in homozygous GG infants (RR 2.6, 95% CI: 1.1–6.0, p = 0.021). The IL-10 -1082A allele was associated with an increased incidence of late BSI. One or more episodes of late BSI developed in 14 (35%) of 40 infants with the GG genotype, 71 (49%) of 145 infants with the GA genotype and 63 (58%) of 108 infants with the AA genotype (p = 0.036). Infants with the A allele (AA or GA genotypes) had an incidence of late BSI that was 134/253 (53%) compared to 14/40 (35%) in homozygous GG infants (RR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.04–4.19, p = 0.035). The CD14 -260 C/T SNP did not alter the overall risk for BSI in ventilated VLBW infants. Multiple BSI episodes were more common in the TT genotype group (CC: 17%, CT: 11%, TT: 30%, p = 0.022). This effect was due to the strong effect of the TT genotype on the incidence of multiple BSI in AA infants (CC: 15%, CT: 11%, TT: 39%, p = 0.003).

Conclusion

The IL-6 -174 G/C, IL-10 -1082 G/A and CD14 -260 C/T SNPs may alter risk for BSI in ventilated VLBW infants.