Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Biology and BioMed Central.

Journal App

google play app store
Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Clustered ChIP-Seq-defined transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications map distinct classes of regulatory elements

Morten Rye1*, Pål Sætrom12, Tony Håndstad1 and Finn Drabløs1

Author affiliations

1 Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine Laboratory Center, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Erling Skjalgssons Gate 1, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway

2 Department of Computer and Information Science, Sem Sælands Vei 7-9, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway

For all author emails, please log on.

Citation and License

BMC Biology 2011, 9:80  doi:10.1186/1741-7007-9-80

Published: 24 November 2011

Abstract

Background

Transcription factor binding to DNA requires both an appropriate binding element and suitably open chromatin, which together help to define regulatory elements within the genome. Current methods of identifying regulatory elements, such as promoters or enhancers, typically rely on sequence conservation, existing gene annotations or specific marks, such as histone modifications and p300 binding methods, each of which has its own biases.

Results

Herein we show that an approach based on clustering of transcription factor peaks from high-throughput sequencing coupled with chromatin immunoprecipitation (Chip-Seq) can be used to evaluate markers for regulatory elements. We used 67 data sets for 54 unique transcription factors distributed over two cell lines to create regulatory element clusters. By integrating the clusters from our approach with histone modifications and data for open chromatin, we identified general methylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me) as the most specific marker for transcription factor clusters. Clusters mapping to annotated genes showed distinct patterns in cluster composition related to gene expression and histone modifications. Clusters mapping to intergenic regions fall into two groups either directly involved in transcription, including miRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, or facilitating transcription by long-range interactions. The latter clusters were specifically enriched with H3K4me1, but less with acetylation of lysine 27 on histone 3 or p300 binding.

Conclusion

By integrating genomewide data of transcription factor binding and chromatin structure and using our data-driven approach, we pinpointed the chromatin marks that best explain transcription factor association with different regulatory elements. Our results also indicate that a modest selection of transcription factors may be sufficient to map most regulatory elements in the human genome.

Keywords:
transcription factor; ChIP-Seq; histone modification; chromatin