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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Community health needs assessment with precede-proceed model: a mixed methods study

Ying Li1, Jia Cao2, Hui Lin3, Daikun Li4, Yang Wang5 and Jia He1*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Social Medicine and Health Service Management, College of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No.30 Gaotanyan Road, Shapingba district, Chongqing, PR China

2 College of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No.30 Gaotanyan Road, Shapingba district, Chongqing, PR China

3 Department of Epidemiology, College of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No.30 Gaotanyan Road, Shapingba District, Chongqing, PR China

4 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, No.30 Gaotanyan Road, Shapingba district, Chongqing, PR China

5 School of Public Health, Chongqing Medical University, No.1 Yixueyuan Road, Chongqing, PR China

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BMC Health Services Research 2009, 9:181  doi:10.1186/1472-6963-9-181

Published: 9 October 2009

Abstract

Background

Community health services in China have developed over the last few decades. In order to use limited health resources more effectively, we conducted a community health needs assessment. This aimed to provide an understanding of the community's health problems and the range of potential factors affecting risk behaviours for the priority health problems.

Methods

We used the precede-proceed model for the needs assessment. Triangulation of data, methods and researchers were employed in data collection.

Results

Main findings include: cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) were identified as the priority health problems in the study communities; risk factors associated with CVDs included smoking, physical inactivity and unhealthy eating behaviours, particularly amongst male residents with low education level; factors negatively affecting behaviours were classified into predisposing factors (limited knowledge, beliefs and lack of perceived needs), enabling factors (limited access to health promotion activities, unawareness of health promotion, lack of work-site and school health promotion, absence of health promotion related policy) and reinforcing factors (culture). Policies and organization were not perfect; there were limited staff skilled in providing health promotion in the community.

Conclusion

CVDs were identified by the communities as priority health problems. Future health programs should focus on smoking, physical inactivity and unhealthy eating behaviours. Behaviour change strategies should take predisposing factors, enabling factors and reinforcing factors into consideration. Policies, organization and human resource need strengthening.