Table 2

Definitions of criteria for priority setting included in the criteria map
Category Criteria Definition
Health level Effectiveness on individual level Interventions that are effective in reduction of the morbidity and mortality, as measured on individual person level, may deserve priority.
Effectiveness on population level Interventions that are effective in reduction of the morbidity and mortality, as measured on population level, may deserve priority.
Patient reported health status Interventions that have high impact on patient reported health status may deserve priority.
Safety Interventions that do not harm in terms of morbidity and mortality may deserve priority.
Health distribution Various criteria All criteria proposed in the map have the same underlying rationale: all people should have as much of a fair chance to live a healthy life, and therefore interventions focusing on certain social groups may deserve priority.
Responsiveness Patient perceived quality of care Interventions that are responsive according to patient’s expectations of quality of care may deserve priority.
Burden of disease Interventions that focus on a high burden of disease in society may deserve priority.
Social & financial risk protection Catastrophic health expenditure Health care related costs can push people into poverty. Interventions that protect people against catastrophic health expenditure may deserve priority.
Economic productivity & care for others People who are economically productive and/or take care of others and become ill face income loss and health related costs, which could lead to poverty. Interventions that target those people may deserve priority.
Rare diseases Interventions for rare diseases might be very costly (because of the small number patients) and could push people into poverty. Therefore, these interventions may deserve priority.
Improved efficiency Size of target population Interventions that show economies of scale because they target a high number of people may deserve priority.
Feasibility Service delivery Service requirements Interventions that are easy to implement because of the current service capacity may have priority. E.g. availability of: service infrastructure, delivery models, safety and quality and management.
Health workforce Health workforce requirements Interventions that are easy to implement because of the current health workforce capacity may have priority. E.g. availability workforce and workforce policies, preferences of workforce for working conditions.
Information Information requirements Interventions that are easy to implement because of the current information system capacity may have priority. E.g. availability of surveillance systems.
Medical products, vaccines & technology Medical products, vaccines & technology requirements Interventions that are easy to implement because of the current medical products, vaccines & technology capacity may have priority. E.g. norms, standards and reliability procurement.
Financing Unit costs Interventions that have small unit cost per patient may have priority.
Budget impact Interventions that consume a small part of the budget may have priority.
Financing party Interventions that receive sustainable financing may have priority.
Leadership/governance Congruency previous priority setting Interventions that are in line with previous spending pattern may have priority.
Cultural acceptability Interventions that are cultural acceptable, because of the norms and values, may have priority.
Political acceptability Interventions that are political acceptable may have priority.
Stakeholder acceptability Interventions that are accepted by important stakeholder groups (e.g. patients groups, taxpayers, health care providers, donor agencies, voters) may have priority.
Legal barriers Interventions that face no legal barriers may have priority.

Tromp and Baltussen

Tromp and Baltussen BMC Health Services Research 2012 12:454   doi:10.1186/1472-6963-12-454

Open Data