Table 1

Study outcomes, scales, single items grouped into scales (R indicates reverse coding of item)
Impact of Senior Resident Schedule on Seniors’ Wellness
Allows general wellness Adversely affects their health (R); Restricts their participation in physical activity after work (R); Impairs their ability to adapt to Circadian Rhythm changes (R); Contributes to their overall sleep debt (R); Contributes to their overall fatigue levels (R); Contributes to frequent episodes of physical illness (e.g. colds) (R); Enhances their overall energy levels; Contributes to their need to use stimulants such as caffeine (R).
Allows exposure to personal harm Impairs safety while driving home post call; Allows potential for workplace harm such as needle-stick injuries.
Causes conflicting role demands Makes it easy for them to trade on call shifts with others (R); Allows free time to accomplish their non-work related errands (R); Provides opportunities to spend time with their family (R); Restricts their time available to do research.
Allows healthy relationships Allows healthy interpersonal relationships.
Causes feelings of isolation Causes them to feel isolated at times (R).
Impact of Senior Resident Schedule on Seniors’ Ability to Deliver Quality Health Care
Allows potential for error They are alert during procedures (R); They commit preventable medical errors; They experience "near misses" related to poor patient care; They are often too tired to provide safe patient care.
Allows clinical skills expertise They miss important diagnoses (R); They manage complex medical patients appropriately; The content of their patient care handover is accurate; They perform a thorough work up of new admissions.
Allows continuity of patient care They highlight important follow up items during handover of patient care issues; They maintain continuity of patient care; They assume accountability for the patients they admit.
Causes expenditure of emotional labour Their interactions with other MTU team members are positive (R); They communicate well with patients and their families (R); They are sensitive to social issues pertaining to patient care (e.g. gender and culture) (R).
Allows work efficiency They are able to effectively multitask during busy work times; They handover patient care issues in a time efficient manner; They respond to pages in a timely fashion.
Impact of Senior Resident Schedule on Seniors’ Medical Education Experience
Allows successful teaching They have enough time to teach junior residents and clerks; They have enough energy to teach junior residents and clerks; They are confident in their ability to teach procedural skills; They are confident in their ability to teach how to run a code; They are confident in their ability to teach how to manage unstable critically ill patients.
Allows medical skills proficiency They are confident in their ability to perform procedures; They are confident in their ability to run a code; They are confident in their ability to manage unstable critically ill patients.
Allows successful learning They have opportunities to learn procedures through simulation training; They can acquire new knowledge; They can retain new knowledge to apply to patient care; Their overall educational experience is satisfying.
Allows staff physician supervision They have the opportunity to review cases with attending physicians; Their clinical skills (history and physical) are observed by an attending physician; They receive feedback from attending physicians.
Causes rotation disruptions Their ambulatory care rotations are frequently interrupted due to MTU on call duties.

Fabreau et al.

Fabreau et al. BMC Medical Education 2013 13:115   doi:10.1186/1472-6920-13-115

Open Data