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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Attitudes of medical students to medical leadership and management: a systematic review to inform curriculum development

Mark R Abbas1*, Thelma A Quince1, Diana F Wood2 and John A Benson1

Author Affiliations

1 General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit, University of Cambridge, Forvie Site, Robinson way, Cambridge, CB2 0SR, UK

2 University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Box 111 Addenbrookes Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2SP, UK

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BMC Medical Education 2011, 11:93  doi:10.1186/1472-6920-11-93

Published: 14 November 2011

Abstract

Background

There is a growing acknowledgement that doctors need to develop leadership and management competences to become more actively involved in the planning, delivery and transformation of patient services. We undertook a systematic review of what is known concerning the knowledge, skills and attitudes of medical students regarding leadership and management. Here we report the results pertaining to the attitudes of students to provide evidence to inform curriculum development in this developing field of medical education.

Methods

We searched major electronic databases and citation indexes within the disciplines of medicine, education, social science and management. We undertook hand searching of major journals, and reference and citation tracking. We accessed websites of UK medical institutions and contacted individuals working within the field.

Results

26 studies were included. Most were conducted in the USA, using mainly quantitative methods. We used inductive analysis of the topics addressed by each study to identity five main content areas: Quality Improvement; Managed Care, Use of Resources and Costs; General Leadership and Management; Role of the Doctor, and Patient Safety. Students have positive attitudes to clinical practice guidelines, quality improvement techniques and multidisciplinary teamwork, but mixed attitudes to managed care, cost containment and medical error. Education interventions had variable effects on students' attitudes. Medical students perceive a need for leadership and management education but identified lack of curriculum time and disinterest in some activities as potential barriers to implementation.

Conclusions

The findings from our review may reflect the relatively little emphasis given to leadership and management in medical curricula. However, students recognise a need to develop leadership and management competences. Although further work needs to be undertaken, using rigorous methods, to identify the most effective and cost-effective curriculum innovations, this review offers the only currently available summary of work examining the attitudes of students to this important area of development for future doctors.