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Open Access Research article

More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

Felix G Meinel12*, Konstantinos Dimitriadis13, Philip von der Borch14, Sylvère Störmann14, Sophie Niedermaier15 and Martin R Fischer6

Author Affiliations

1 MeCuM-Mentor Projektbüro, Medizinische Poliklinik Campus Innenstadt, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU), Pettenkofer Str. 8a, 80336 München, Germany

2 Institut für klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der LMU, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 München, Germany

3 Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum der LMU, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 München, Germany

4 Medizinische Klinik Campus Innenstadt, Klinikum der LMU, Ziemssenstr. 1, 80336 München, Germany

5 Kinderklinik und Kinderpoliklinik im Dr. von Haunerschen Kinderspital, Klinikum der LMU, Lindwurmstr. 4, 80337 München, Germany

6 Lehrstuhl für Didaktik und Ausbildungsforschung in der Medizin, Medizinische Klinik Campus Innenstadt, Klinikum der LMU, Ziemssenstr. 1, 80336 München, Germany

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BMC Medical Education 2011, 11:68  doi:10.1186/1472-6920-11-68

Published: 24 September 2011

Abstract

Background

Despite increasing recognition that mentoring is essential early in medical careers, little is known about the prevalence of mentoring programs for medical students. We conducted this study to survey all medical schools in Germany regarding the prevalence of mentoring programs for medical students as well as the characteristics, goals and effectiveness of these programs.

Methods

A definition of mentoring was established and program inclusion criteria were determined based on a review of the literature. The literature defined mentoring as a steady, long-lasting relationship designed to promote the mentee's overall development. We developed a questionnaire to assess key characteristics of mentoring programs: the advocated mentoring model, the number of participating mentees and mentors, funding and staff, and characteristics of mentees and mentors (e.g., level of training). In addition, the survey characterized the mentee-mentor relationship regarding the frequency of meetings, forms of communication, incentives for mentors, the mode of matching mentors and mentees, and results of program evaluations. Furthermore, participants were asked to characterize the aims of their programs. The questionnaire consisted of 34 questions total, in multiple-choice (17), numeric (7) and free-text (10) format. This questionnaire was sent to deans and medical education faculty in Germany between June and September 2009. For numeric answers, mean, median, and standard deviation were determined. For free-text items, responses were coded into categories using qualitative free text analysis.

Results

We received responses from all 36 medical schools in Germany. We found that 20 out of 36 medical schools in Germany offer 22 active mentoring programs with a median of 125 and a total of 5,843 medical students (6.9 - 7.4% of all German medical students) enrolled as mentees at the time of the survey. 14 out of 22 programs (63%) have been established within the last 2 years. Six programs (27%) offer mentoring in a one-on-one setting. 18 programs (82%) feature faculty physicians as mentors. Nine programs (41%) involve students as mentors in a peer-mentoring setting. The most commonly reported goals of the mentoring programs include: establishing the mentee's professional network (13 programs, 59%), enhancement of academic performance (11 programs, 50%) and counseling students in difficulties (10 programs, 45%).

Conclusions

Despite a clear upsurge of mentoring programs for German medical students over recent years, the overall availability of mentoring is still limited. The mentoring models and goals of the existing programs vary considerably. Outcome data from controlled studies are needed to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of different forms of mentoring for medical students.