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Open Access Research article

Nutrition attitudes and knowledge in medical students after completion of an integrated nutrition curriculum compared to a dedicated nutrition curriculum: a quasi-experimental study

Carolyn O Walsh1*, Sonja I Ziniel23, Helen K Delichatsios4 and David S Ludwig5

Author Affiliations

1 Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA

2 Harvard Medical School, 260 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA

3 Clinical Research Program, Children's Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA

4 Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 165 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA

5 Optimal Weight for Life Program, Children's Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA

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BMC Medical Education 2011, 11:58  doi:10.1186/1472-6920-11-58

Published: 12 August 2011

First paragraph (this article has no abstract)

Nutrition education has presented an ongoing challenge to medical educators. In the 2007-2008 academic year, Harvard Medical School replaced its dedicated Preventive Medicine and Nutrition course with an integrated curriculum. The objective of the current study was to assess the effect of the curriculum change on medical student attitudes and knowledge about nutrition.