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Open Access Research article

Evidence based practice profiles: Differences among allied health professions

Maureen P McEvoy*, Marie T Williams and Timothy S Olds

Author Affiliations

School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, North Tce, Adelaide, 5000, Australia

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BMC Medical Education 2010, 10:69  doi:10.1186/1472-6920-10-69

Published: 12 October 2010

Abstract

Background

Most previous studies of allied health professionals' evidence based practice (EBP) attitudes, knowledge and behaviours have been conducted with profession specific questionnaires of variable psychometric strength. This study compared the self-report EBP profiles of allied health professionals/trainees in an Australian university.

Methods

The Evidence-Based Practice Profile (EBP2) questionnaire assessed five domains (Relevance, Terminology, Practice, Confidence, Sympathy) in 918 subjects from five professional disciplines. One and 2-way factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t-tests analysed differences based on prior exposure to EBP, stage of training, professional discipline, age and gender.

Results

There were significant differences between stages of training (p < 0.001) for all domains and between EBP exposure groups for all but one domain (Sympathy). Professional discipline groups differed for Relevance, Terminology, Practice (p < 0.001) and Confidence (p = 0.006). Males scored higher for Confidence (p = 0.002) and females for Sympathy (p = 0.04), older subjects (> 24 years) scored higher for all domains (p < 0.05). Age and exposure affected all domains (p < 0.02). Differences in stages of training largely explained age-related differences in Confidence and Practice (p ≤ 0.001) and exposure-related differences in Confidence, Practice and Sympathy (p ≤ 0.023).

Conclusions

Across five allied health professions, self-report EBP characteristics varied with EBP exposure, across stages of training, with profession and with age.