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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

A yoga intervention for type 2 diabetes risk reduction: a pilot randomized controlled trial

Kelly A McDermott1*, Mohan Raghavendra Rao2, Raghuram Nagarathna2, Elizabeth J Murphy3, Adam Burke4, Ramarao Hongasandra Nagendra2 and Frederick M Hecht1

Author Affiliations

1 Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, University of California, 1545 Divisadero St., San Francisco, CA 94115, USA

2 Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana, Bangalore, India

3 Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA

4 Institute for Holistic Health Studies, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA

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BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2014, 14:212  doi:10.1186/1472-6882-14-212

Published: 1 July 2014

Abstract

Background

Type 2 diabetes is a major health problem in many countries including India. Yoga may be an effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategy in India, particularly given its cultural familiarity.

Methods

This was a parallel, randomized controlled pilot study to collect feasibility and preliminary efficacy data on yoga for diabetes risk factors among people at high risk of diabetes. Primary outcomes included: changes in BMI, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and cholesterol. We also looked at measures of psychological well-being including changes in depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect and perceived stress. Forty-one participants with elevated fasting blood glucose in Bangalore, India were randomized to either yoga (n = 21) or a walking control (n = 20). Participants were asked to either attend yoga classes or complete monitored walking 3–6 days per week for eight weeks. Randomization and allocation was performed using computer-generated random numbers and group assignments delivered in sealed, opaque envelopes generated by off-site study staff. Data were analyzed based on intention to treat.

Results

This study was feasible in terms of recruitment, retention and adherence. In addition, yoga participants had significantly greater reductions in weight, waist circumference and BMI versus control (weight −0.8 ± 2.1 vs. 1.4 ± 3.6, p = 0.02; waist circumference −4.2 ± 4.8 vs. 0.7 ± 4.2, p < 0.01; BMI −0.2 ± 0.8 vs. 0.6 ± 1.6, p = 0.05). There were no between group differences in fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, insulin resistance or any other factors related to diabetes risk or psychological well-being. There were significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, anxiety, depression, negative affect and perceived stress in both the yoga intervention and walking control over the course of the study.

Conclusion

Among Indians with elevated fasting blood glucose, we found that participation in an 8-week yoga intervention was feasible and resulted in greater weight loss and reduction in waist circumference when compared to a walking control. Yoga offers a promising lifestyle intervention for decreasing weight-related type 2 diabetes risk factors and potentially increasing psychological well-being.

Trial registration

ClinicalTrials.gov Identified NCT00090506.

Keywords:
Yoga; Prediabetes; Type 2 diabetes; India; Randomized controlled pilot