Open Access Research article

Dimerization of inositol monophosphatase Mycobacterium tuberculosis SuhB is not constitutive, but induced by binding of the activator Mg2+

Alistair K Brown1, Guoyu Meng14, Hemza Ghadbane1, David J Scott2, Lynn G Dover1, Jérôme Nigou3, Gurdyal S Besra1* and Klaus Fütterer1*

Author Affiliations

1 School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK

2 National Centre for Macromolecular Hydrodynamics, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, LE12 5RD, UK

3 Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Mycobacterial Infections, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Unité Mixte de Recherche 5089, Toulouse, France

4 Present address : School of Crystallography, Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX, UK

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Structural Biology 2007, 7:55  doi:10.1186/1472-6807-7-55

Published: 28 August 2007

Abstract

Background

The cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a wide range of phosphatidyl inositol-based glycolipids that play critical structural roles and, in part, govern pathogen-host interactions. Synthesis of phosphatidyl inositol is dependent on free myo-inositol, generated through dephosphorylation of myo-inositol-1-phosphate by inositol monophosphatase (IMPase). Human IMPase, the putative target of lithium therapy, has been studied extensively, but the function of four IMPase-like genes in M. tuberculosis is unclear.

Results

We determined the crystal structure, to 2.6 Å resolution, of the IMPase M. tuberculosis SuhB in the apo form, and analysed self-assembly by analytical ultracentrifugation. Contrary to the paradigm of constitutive dimerization of IMPases, SuhB is predominantly monomeric in the absence of the physiological activator Mg2+, in spite of a conserved fold and apparent dimerization in the crystal. However, Mg2+ concentrations that result in enzymatic activation of SuhB decisively promote dimerization, with the inhibitor Li+ amplifying the effect of Mg2+, but failing to induce dimerization on its own.

Conclusion

The correlation of Mg2+-driven enzymatic activity with dimerization suggests that catalytic activity is linked to the dimer form. Current models of lithium inhibition of IMPases posit that Li+ competes for one of three catalytic Mg2+ sites in the active site, stabilized by a mobile loop at the dimer interface. Our data suggest that Mg2+/Li+-induced ordering of this loop may promote dimerization by expanding the dimer interface of SuhB. The dynamic nature of the monomer-dimer equilibrium may also explain the extended concentration range over which Mg2+ maintains SuhB activity.