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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Evolutionary traces decode molecular mechanism behind fast pace of myosin XI

Divya P Syamaladevi12 and R Sowdhamini1*

Author affiliations

1 National Centre for Biological Sciences, UAS-GKVK Campus, Bellary Road, Bangalore 560 065, India

2 Sugarcane Breeding Institute(SBI-ICAR), Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu 641 007, India

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Citation and License

BMC Structural Biology 2011, 11:35  doi:10.1186/1472-6807-11-35

Published: 26 September 2011

Abstract

Background

Cytoplasmic class XI myosins are the fastest processive motors known. This class functions in high-velocity cytoplasmic streaming in various plant cells from algae to angiosperms. The velocities at which they process are ten times faster than its closest class V homologues.

Results

To provide sequence determinants and structural rationale for the molecular mechanism of this fast pace myosin, we have compared the sequences from myosin class V and XI through Evolutionary Trace (ET) analysis. The current study identifies class-specific residues of myosin XI spread over the actin binding site, ATP binding site and light chain binding neck region. Sequences for ET analysis were accumulated from six plant genomes, using literature based text search and sequence searches, followed by triple validation viz. CDD search, string-based searches and phylogenetic clustering. We have identified nine myosin XI genes in sorghum and seven in grape by sequence searches. Both the plants possess one gene product each belonging to myosin type VIII as well. During this process, we have re-defined the gene boundaries for three sorghum myosin XI genes using fgenesh program.

Conclusion

Molecular modelling and subsequent analysis of putative interactions involving these class-specific residues suggest a structural basis for the molecular mechanism behind high velocity of plant myosin XI. We propose a model of a more flexible switch I region that contributes to faster ADP release leading to high velocity movement of the algal myosin XI.