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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Enhancement of hybridoma formation, clonability and cell proliferation in a nanoparticle-doped aqueous environment

Natalie Gavrilov-Yusim1, Ekaterina Hahiashvili1, Marina Tashker1, Victoria Yavelsky1, Ohad Karnieli2 and Leslie Lobel1*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Virology and Developmental Genetics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva 84105, Israel

2 Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel

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BMC Biotechnology 2008, 8:3  doi:10.1186/1472-6750-8-3

Published: 14 January 2008

Abstract

Background

The isolation and production of human monoclonal antibodies is becoming an increasingly important pursuit as biopharmaceutical companies migrate their drug pipelines away from small organic molecules. As such, optimization of monoclonal antibody technologies is important, as this is becoming the new rate-limiting step for discovery and development of new pharmaceuticals. The major limitations of this system are the efficiency of isolating hybridoma clones, the process of stabilizing these clones and optimization of hybridoma cell secretion, especially for large-scale production.

Many previous studies have demonstrated how perturbations in the aqueous environment can impact upon cell biology. In particular, radio frequency (RF) irradiation of solutions can have dramatic effects on behavior of solutions, cells and in particular membrane proteins, although this effect decays following removal of the RF. Recently, it was shown that nanoparticle doping of RF irradiated water (NPD water) produced a stabilized aqueous medium that maintained the characteristic properties of RF irradiated water for extended periods of time. Therefore, the ordering effect in water of the RF irradiation can now be studied in systems that required prolonged periods for analysis, such as eukaryotic cell culture. Since the formation of hybridoma cells involves the formation of a new membrane, a process that is affected by the surrounding aqueous environment, we tested these nanoparticle doped aqueous media formulations on hybridoma cell production.

Results

In this study, we tested the entire process of isolation and production of human monoclonal antibodies in NPD water as a means for further enhancing human monoclonal antibody isolation and production. Our results indicate an overall enhancement of hybridoma yield, viability, clonability and secretion. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that immortal cells proliferate faster whereas primary human fibroblasts proliferate slower in NPD water.

Conclusion

Overall, these studies indicate that NPD water can enhance cell proliferation, clonability and secretion. Furthermore, the results support the hypothesis that NPD water is effectively composed of stable microenvironments.