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Open Access Research article

Feasibility of enhanced recovery after surgery in gastric surgery: a retrospective study

Takanobu Yamada12*, Tsutomu Hayashi12, Toru Aoyama12, Junya Shirai12, Hirohito Fujikawa12, Haruhiko Cho1, Takaki Yoshikawa1, Yasushi Rino2, Munetaka Masuda2, Hideki Taniguchi3, Ryoji Fukushima4 and Akira Tsuburaya1

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Kanagawa Cancer Center, 1-1-2 Nakao, Asahi, 241-0815 Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan

2 Department of Surgery, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan

3 Department of Anesthesiology, Kanagawa Cancer Center, 1-1-2 Nakao, Asahi, 241-0815 Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan

4 Department of Surgery, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, 173-8605 Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

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BMC Surgery 2014, 14:41  doi:10.1186/1471-2482-14-41

Published: 8 July 2014

Abstract

Background

Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs have been reported to be feasible and useful for maintaining physiological function and facilitating recovery after colorectal surgery. The feasibility of such programs in gastric surgery remains unclear. This study assessed whether an ERAS program is feasible in patients who undergo gastric surgery.

Methods

The subjects were patients who underwent gastric surgery between June 2009 and February 2011 at the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Kanagawa Cancer Center. They received perioperative care according to an ERAS program. All data were retrieved retrospectively. The primary end point was the incidence of postoperative complications. The secondary end point was postoperative outcomes.

Results

A total of 203 patients were studied. According to the Clavien-Dindo classification, the incidence of ≥ grade 2 postoperative complications was 10.8% and that of ≥ grade 3 complications was 3.9%. Nearly all patients did not require delay of meal step-up (95.1%). Only 6 patients (3.0%) underwent reoperation. The median postoperative hospital stay was 9 days. Only 4 patients (2.0%) required readmission. There was no mortality.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that our ERAS program is feasible in patients who undergo gastric surgery.

Keywords:
Enhanced recovery after surgery; Gastric cancer; Gastrectomy; Feasibility; Postoperative complications