Table 3

Absolute inequality (SII) for all cause mortality 25–77 year olds by income and education

By income


Early 1980s

Late 1980s

Early 1990s

Late 1990s

% change†

P-trend ‡


Men

All-Cause

Sweden

1265 (598–1932)

(546–1445)

716 (503–929)

669 (138–1200)

↓ 51%

0.06

New Zealand

679 (344–1015)

677 (593–761)

779 (638–919)

766 (635–896)

↑ 16%

0.13

Women

All-Cause

Sweden

535 (207–862)

453 (451–455)

485 (346–625)

589 (524–655)

↑ 12%

0.03

New Zealand

308 (234–382)

347 (321–374)

369 (365–373)

374 (307–441)

↑ 21%

0.04


By education


Men

All-Cause

Sweden

719 (336–1103)

560 (16–1104)

409 (371–446)

243 (-38–524)

↓ 66%

<.01

New Zealand

598 (542–655)

558 (428–688)

530 (280–780)

496 (262–731)

↓ 17%

<.01

Women

All-Cause

Sweden

354 (331–377)

339 (285–393)

299 (230–369)

294 (105–483)

↓ 19%

0.03

New Zealand

370 (228–512)

333 (281–384)

380 (202–558)

320 (223–417)

↓ 8%

0.53


† The percentage change is from 1981–84 to 1996–99, estimated by fitting a ordinary least squares regression (unweighted) to the SIIs to work out the regression-estimated change in the SII over time, the regression estimated value for 1981–84, and hence the percentage change.

‡ We conducted ordinary least squares regression of the SII on census year (weighted by the inverse of the variance of the SII), and used the p-value for the census year term as our p-value for trend.

Wamala et al. BMC Public Health 2006 6:164   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-6-164

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