Table 3

Key characteristics of “more routine”a versus “less routine”b testers for HIV in the past yearc
More routine testers (n=173) were more likely to: Less routine testers (n=157) were more likely to:
Be OB/GYNd (47%) Not be OB/GYN (only 12% are OB/GYN)
Report testing patients as routine practice (74%) Report testing only patients who have risk factors (39% test routinely)
Be <40 years old (32%; mean age 46 yrs) Be >40 years old (81%; mean age 49 yrs)
Be womene (60%) Be men (55%)
Have been tested for HIV themselves in past year (37%) Not have been tested for HIV themselves in past year (only 16% were tested)
Perceive a higher local prevalence of HIV at the county (16%) and state (16%) levels Perceive a lower local prevalence of HIV at the county (10%) and state (11%) levels
Have relatively more patients who are: Have relatively fewer patients who are:
 Black (62%)  Black (52%)
 Low SES (34%)  Low SES (27%)
 On Medicaid (30%)  On Medicaid (18%)
 HIV positive (9%)  HIV positive (4%)

aTested more than 25% of patients (>50% on average); bTested 0-7% of patients (<3% on average); levels of testing were calculated relative to the data distribution of testing rates in which approximately the top one-third of respondents fell into the “more routine” category and the bottom one-third fell into the “less routine” category. cPercent differences between more and less routine testers were significant (P<0.05); dOB/GYNs tested more frequently regardless of physician gender; eFemale physicians’ testing rates were likely inflated by over-representation of OB/GYNs; OB/GYN, Obstetrics/Gynecology; SES, socio-economic status.

Wong et al.

Wong et al. BMC Public Health 2013 13:96   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-96

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