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Open Access Research article

Factors associated with parental smoking in the presence of school-aged children: a cross-sectional study

Yuan-Mei Liao1, Yu-Ting Chen12, Liang-Chun Kuo1 and Ping-Ling Chen3*

Author Affiliations

1 Graduate Institute of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, No. 250, Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei City 110, Taiwan

2 School of Nursing, College of Medicine, Chang-Gung University, No. 259, Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan

3 Graduate Institute of Injury Prevention and Control, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, No. 250, Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei City 110, Taiwan

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BMC Public Health 2013, 13:819  doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-819

Published: 10 September 2013

Abstract

Background

In 2009, the Tobacco Hazards Prevention Act (Taiwan) was amended to more effectively restrict smoking in indoor public places and workplaces in Taiwan. However, the lack of prohibitions for smoking in private homes may place family members at increased risk for exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). The aim of our study was to determine the factors associated with parental smoking in the presence of children at home.

Methods

In 2010, we performed a cross-sectional study of factors associated with parental smoking in the presence of children at home in Taiwan using self-administered questionnaires. Quota sampling was used to select five primary schools from four different regions of Taiwan. Parents were surveyed to identify parental smokers and 307 parental smokers were selected for participation in our study. Questionnaire data regarding parental smoking in the presence of children at home and related interactions among family members were analyzed. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to determine the best-fit model for examining the relationships among the variables related to parental smoking in the presence of children at home.

Results

Two-thirds of parents who smoked reported smoking in the presence of their children. The results of the hierarchical logistic regression analysis identified the smokers’ compliance with their family’s antismoking responses, mutual agreement with smoking bans, daily smoking, smoking more than 20 cigarettes per day, the education level of the parental smoker, and the annual family income as determinants of smoking in the presence of children at home.

Conclusions

Households with smoking parents should be targeted for interventions to encourage the adoption and enforcement of home smoking bans. Educational interventions that promote smoke-free homes for children and provide support to help parents stop smoking are critical factors in reducing the frequency of children’s ETS exposure in the home.

Keywords:
Parental smoking; Environmental tobacco smoke; Children; Perception; Family influence