Table 3

Knowledge on HPV infection, Pap smear, and cervical cancer (N = 256)a
Overall distribution (N = 256) Correct answers by age group, N (%)
Knowledge item (correct response) Yes No Don’t Know 18-24 years old (N = 125) 25 years and above (N = 131) p-value
HPV is transmitted by sexual activities (yes) 77 (30.4%) 45 (17.8%) 131 (51.8%) 33 (26.4%) 44 (33.6%) 0.223
If a woman has an earlier sexual debut or has more sexual partners, she is more likely to have cervical cancer (yes) 109 (42.9%) 39 (15.4%) 106 (41.7%) 48 (38.4%) 61 (46.6%) 0.207
HPV infection increased the likelihood of getting cervical cancer (yes) 91 (35.5%) 13 (5.1%) 150 (59.1%) 36 (28.8%) 55 (42.0%) 0.036
Women should do pap smear once a year (yes) 106 (41.9%) 13 (5.1%) 134 (53.0%) 43 (34.4%) 63 (48.1%) 0.031
Women older than 21 yrs or have more than 3 yrs of sexual activities, should do pap smear every year (yes) 105 (41.5%) 12 (4.7%) 136 (53.8%) 43 (34.4%) 62 (47.3%) 0.042
The best time for HPV vaccine is age 11 to 12 yrs old (yes) 31 (12.3%) 35 (13.9%) 186 (73.8%) 11 (8.8%) 20 (15.3%) 0.128
If a woman receives HPV vaccine, she doesn’t need to do pap smear any more (no) 32 (12.6%) 65 (25.7%) 156 (61.7%) 30 (24.0%) 35 (26.7%) 0.668
Mean scoreb (SD, Range) 2.3 (2.3, 0–7) 2.0 (2.3,0-7) 2.6 (2.3,0-7) 0.026

Notes: a Only included women who were aware of cervical cancer and HPV (n = 256) in the knowledge assessment; b Mean score is the sum of the correct responses to the seven items evaluating HPV knowledge.

Hong et al.

Hong et al. BMC Public Health 2013 13:696   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-696

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