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Open Access Study protocol

A randomised controlled trial testing a web-based, computer-tailored self-management intervention for people with or at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a study protocol

Viola Voncken-Brewster1*, Huibert Tange1, Hein de Vries2, Zsolt Nagykaldi3, Bjorn Winkens14 and Trudy van der Weijden1

Author affiliations

1 School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI), Department of General Practice, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200MD, Maastricht, Netherlands

2 School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI), Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, Netherlands

3 Health Sciences Centre, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

4 School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI), Department of Methodology and Statistics, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, Netherlands

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Citation and License

BMC Public Health 2013, 13:557  doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-557

Published: 7 June 2013

Abstract

Background

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Effective self-management support interventions are needed to improve the health and functional status of people with COPD or at risk for COPD. Computer-tailored technology could be an effective way to provide this support.

Methods/Design

This paper presents the protocol of a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a web-based, computer-tailored self-management intervention to change health behaviours of people with or at risk for COPD. An intervention group will be compared to a usual care control group, in which the intervention group will receive a web-based, computer-tailored self-management intervention. Participants will be recruited from an online panel and through general practices. Outcomes will be measured at baseline and at 6 months. The primary outcomes will be smoking behaviour, measuring the 7-day point prevalence abstinence and physical activity, measured in minutes. Secondary outcomes will include dyspnoea score, quality of life, stages of change, intention to change behaviour and alternative smoking behaviour measures, including current smoking behaviour, 24-hour point prevalence abstinence, prolonged abstinence, continued abstinence and number of quit attempts.

Discussion

To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a web-based, computer-tailored self-management intervention for people with or at risk for COPD. The results will be important to explore the possible benefits of computer-tailored interventions for the self-management of people with or at risk for COPD and potentially other chronic health conditions.

Dutch trial register

NTR3421

Keywords:
Internet intervention; Tailoring; Randomised controlled trial; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Self-management; Health behaviour; Chronic disease