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Open Access Research article

Voluntary HIV testing and risky sexual behaviours among health care workers: a survey in rural and urban Burkina Faso

Fati Kirakoya-Samadoulougou1*, Seydou Yaro2, Alain Deccache3, Paulin Fao2, Marie-Christine Defer2, Nicolas Meda24, Annie Robert1 and Nicolas Nagot5

Author affiliations

1 Pôle Epidémiologie et Biostatistique, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique (IREC), Faculté de Santé Publique (FSP), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium

2 Centre Muraz, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

3 Institut de recherche santé et société (IRSS), Faculté de Santé Publique (FSP), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium

4 Département de santé publique, Université de Ouagadougou, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

5 INSERM U1058 «Infection by HIV and by agents with mucocutaneous tropism: from pathogenesis to prevention, Université Montpellier 1 & CHRU Montpellier, Montpellier, France

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Citation and License

BMC Public Health 2013, 13:540  doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-540

Published: 5 June 2013

Abstract

Background

Voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) together with a safe sexual behaviour is an important preventive strategy in the control of HIV. Although Health care workers (HCWs) are critical in the response to HIV, little is known about VCT and high risk behaviours (HRB) among this group in West Africa. This study aims to assess the prevalence of VCT and HRB among HCWs in Burkina Faso.

Methods

We collected data through a questionnaire in urban areas (Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso) and rural areas (Poni and Yatenga) among HCWs from 97 health care facilities. Urine samples were collected, screened for HIV using a Calypte® test kit and confirmed by Western Blot. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with the use of VCT services and with high-risk sex behaviour.

Results

About 92.5% of eligible HCWs participated (1570 out of 1697). Overall, 38.2% of them (34.6% of women and 42.6% of men) had ever used VCT services. About 40% of HCWs reported that fear of knowing the test result was the main reason for not doing the HIV test. Male HCWs (p = 0.001), laboratory workers (p < 0.001), those having two years or more experience (p = 0.03), and those who had multiple partners (p = 0.001) were more likely to have tested for HIV. One fifth of HCWs reported multiple partners. Of these, thirteen percent did not use condoms. HCWs who had multiple partners were significantly more likely to be men, single, living in rural areas, and under the age of 29 years.

Conclusion

VCT was still very low among HCWs in Burkina Faso, while HRB was high.

These findings suggest that ‘HCW-friendly’ VCT centres should be implemented, securing confidentiality among colleagues. In addition, refreshment courses on HIV risk reduction, counselling and testing are certainly required during the professional career of HCWs.

Keywords:
VCT; High-risk sex; Health care workers