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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Evaluation of adult dTPaP vaccination coverage in France: experience in Lyon city, 2010–2011

Dominique Baratin1, Corinne Del Signore2, Jacques Thierry3, Evelyne Caulin4 and Philippe Vanhems12*

Author Affiliations

1 Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Service d’Hygiène, Epidémiologie et Prévention, Lyon, France

2 Institut d’Epidémiologie, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, UMR CNRS 5558, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France

3 Groupement de laboratoires de biologie médicale libéraux DYOMEDEA, Lyon, France

4 Sanofi Pasteur MSD, Lyon, France

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BMC Public Health 2012, 12:940  doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-940

Published: 1 November 2012

Abstract

Background

Compliance with official recommendations can be assessed by evaluating vaccination coverage (VC) in populations. The main objective of our study was to assess VC of adults against diphtheria, tetanus, poliomyelitis and pertussis (dTPaP) according to age. The second objective was to explore if vaccination status could be confirmed by documentation.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted in 680 adults consulting for biological examination in private laboratories in Lyon (France) to evaluate VC for diphtheria, tetanus, poliomyelitis and pertussis (dTPaP) and enabled reported vaccinations to be compared with documented, confirmed vaccinations.

Results

Verification of documented, confirmed vaccinations disclosed VC of 78.7% for tetanus, 63.6% for poliomyelitis, 57.8% for diphtheria and 10.7% for pertussis. Comparison of confirmed and self-reported vaccinations revealed that a large percentage of people who thought that they were vaccinated were not. VC significantly decreased with age for diphtheria and poliomyelitis and did not vary by gender. The VC rate for pertussis has increased since the 2008 recommendations were made.

Conclusions

The main thrust of this study was to compare reported and confirmed data. A significant percentage of people wrongly believed that they were up to date with their vaccination.

Keywords:
Vaccination coverage; Adults; Diphtheria; Tetanus; Poliomyelitis; Pertussis