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Open Access Research article

Socioeconomic status and metabolic syndrome in the general population of China: a cross-sectional study

Yiqiang Zhan1, Jinming Yu1*, Ruoqing Chen1, Junling Gao1, Rongjing Ding2, Yuanyuan Fu2, Lijun Zhang1 and Dayi Hu12

Author Affiliations

1 Institute of Clinical Epidemiology, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety (Ministry of Education), Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, PR, China

2 Heart Center, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing, 100044, PR, China

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BMC Public Health 2012, 12:921  doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-921

Published: 30 October 2012

Abstract

Background

Individual socioeconomic status (SES) has been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases in developed countries, but the association between individual SES and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is still unclear in China. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between individual SES and MetS in China.

Methods

A cross-sectional study of 10054 community residents was performed from May to August 2007 using multistage stratified random sampling. SES was assessed in terms of education, personal monthly income, and household monthly income. The association between SES and MetS was determined by logistic regression models.

Results

After the adjustments regarding age, marital status, smoking, drinking, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and community type, odds ratios (ORs) for MetS of individuals with education level of 7~12 years and >12 years were 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75 to 0.99) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.62 to 0.91) respectively compared with those with education level of <7 years in women. Following the adjustments as above, ORs for MetS of individuals with household monthly income level of middle and higher were 0.94 (95% CI: 0.86 to 0.97), and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.88) respectively compared with those with lower household monthly income level in women. The association between SES and MetS was not significant in men.

Conclusions

Gender had an influence on the association between individual SES and MetS. Lower education and household monthly income level were associated with higher risk of MetS among community residents in women, while such association was not significant in men.

Keywords:
Socioeconomic status; Metabolic syndrome; Cross-sectional study