Table 2

Terrorism avoidance behaviours by socio-demographic & threat perception variables - adjusted odds ratios (AOR)
Outcome variable Independent variable Adjusted odd ratios
AOR [95% CI] p
Avoid certain places
Highest qualification
University degree 1.00
Vocational college diploma 1.21 (0.70, 2.08) 0.501
High school certificate 0.74 (0.37, 1.48) 0.389
Middle high school certificate 2.22 (1.34, 3.68) 0.002
None 1.30 (0.60, 2.82) 0.512
Changed use public transport
Residential location (ARIA+)
Highly accessible (urban) 1.00
Accessible 0.92 (0.45, 1.85) 0.810
Moderately accessible 0.38 (0.15, 0.96) 0.040
Remote/Very remote 0.16 (0.02, 1.30) 0.086
Household income ($A)
<$20 k 1.00
$20-40 k 2.48 (1.07, 5.71) 0.033
$40-60 k 1.07 (0.38, 3.03) 0.892
$60-80 k 1.03 (0.38, 2.82) 0.955
>$80 k 0.65 (0.27, 1.55) 0.333
Changed plans overseas travel
Terrorist attack likely
No 1.00
Yes 1.57 (1.13, 2.17) 0.007
High psychological distress
No 1.00
Yes 1.55 (1.00, 2.39) 0.048
Household income ($A)
<$20 k 1.00
$20-40 k 1.86 (1.02, 3.39) 0.042
$40-60 k 1.91 (1.03, 3.54) 0.040
$60-80 k 1.89 (1.00, 3.56) 0.049
>$80 k 1.75 (0.99, 3.08) 0.053

1. Note: 95% confidence intervals (CI) that include 1.00 indicate a non significant result.

2. Independent variables controlled for were: age; highest educational qualification; household income, no. of children ≤ 16 years in household; residential location (urban or rural, and location remoteness via Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA+); being born in Australia; speaking a language other than English at home (‘minority status’); perceived likelihood of terrorism and self-rated health status, personal resilience (CD-RISC2) and psychological distress (K10).

3. Psychological distress was measured using the K10. Values range from 10–50, with ≥22 considered ‘high’ psychological distress.

Stevens et al.

Stevens et al. BMC Public Health 2012 12:1117   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-1117

Open Data