Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Public Health and BioMed Central.

Open Access Highly Accessed Study protocol

The impact of injuries study. multicentre study assessing physical, psychological, social and occupational functioning post injury - a protocol

Denise Kendrick1*, Claire O'Brien1, Nicola Christie2, Carol Coupland1, Casey Quinn1, Mark Avis3, Marcus Barker4, Jo Barnes5, Frank Coffey6, Stephen Joseph7, Andrew Morris5, Richard Morriss4, Emma Rowley8, Jude Sleney9, Elizabeth Towner10 and Impact of Injuries Study Group

Author Affiliations

1 Division of Primary Care, Tower Building, University Park, NG7 2RD Nottingham, UK

2 Centre for Transport Studies, Dept of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK

3 Nursing, Midwifery & Physiotherapy Department, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queen's Medical Centre Campus, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK

4 Division of Psychiatry, Institute of Mental Health, B Floor, Sir Colin Campbell Building, University of Nottingham Innovation Park, Triumph Road, Nottingham NG7 2TU, UK

5 Transport Safety Research Centre, Loughborough Design School, Loughborough University, Ashby Road, Loughborough LE11 3UZ, UK

6 Emergency Department, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queen's Medical Centre Campus, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK

7 Sociology & Social Policy Department, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK

8 CLAHRC NDL, Sir Colin Campbell Building, University of Nottingham Innovation Park, Nottingham NG7 2TU, UK

9 Department of Sociology Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK

10 Centre for Child & Adolescent Health, University of the West of England, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2BN, UK

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Public Health 2011, 11:963  doi:10.1186/1471-2458-11-963

Published: 31 December 2011

Abstract

Background

Large numbers of people are killed or severely injured following injuries each year and these injuries place a large burden on health care resources. The majority of the severely injured are not fully recovered 12-18 months later. Psychological disorders are common post injury and are associated with poorer functional and occupational outcomes. Much of this evidence comes from countries other than the UK, with differing health care and compensation systems. Early interventions can be effective in treating psychological morbidity, hence the scale and nature of the problem and its impact of functioning in the UK must be known before services can be designed to identify and manage psychological morbidity post injury.

Methods/Design

A longitudinal multi-centre study of 680 injured patients admitted to hospital in four areas across the UK: Nottingham, Leicester/Loughborough, Bristol and Surrey. A stratified sample of injuries will ensure a range of common and less common injuries will be included. Participants will complete a baseline questionnaire about their injury and pre-injury quality of life, and follow-up questionnaires 1, 2, 4, and 12 months post injury. Measures will include health and social care utilisation, perceptions of recovery, physical, psychological, social and occupational functioning and health-related quality of life. A nested qualitative study will explore the experiences of a sample of participants, their carers and service providers to inform service design.

Discussion

This study will quantify physical, psychological, social and occupational functioning and health and social care utilisation following a range of different types of injury and will assess the impact of psychological disorders on function and health service use. The findings will be used to guide the development of interventions to maximise recovery post injury.

Keywords:
Unintentional injury; Disability; Psychological morbidity