Table 1

Parent, child and home food environment characteristics of the 396 study participants

Sample characteristics

Mean (SD)/%


Parent characteristics

Mean age (SD) - years

35.5 (5.3)

Gender - female

96%

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander

2%

Highest educational level

Years 7-9

2%

Years 10

11%

Year 11-12

10%

TAFE (Technical and Further Education)

30%

University

47%

Annual household income*

< $20,000

4%

$20,000 - $39,999

9%

$40,000 - $59,999

11%

$60,000 - $79,999

15%

$80,000 - $99,999

19%

$100,000

41%


Child characteristics

Mean age (SD) - years

4.3 (0.6)

Gender - female

49%

Mean daily serves of fruit (SD)#

2.3 (1.0)

Mean daily serves of vegetables (SD)#

2.1 (1.1)


Home food environment characteristics

Parental role-modeling

Daily serves of fruit & vegetables

5.0 (1.8)

Occasions/day modeled fruit & vegetable consumption

2.3 (1.4)

Pressure to eat

Pressure to eat

3.1 (0.7)

Parent providing behaviour

Times/day parent provides fruit & vegetables

3.2 (1.3)

Fruit and vegetable availability

Different varieties of fruit & vegetables in home

21.7 (4.8)

Fruit and vegetable accessibility

Fruit and vegetables kept in ready to eat format (% yes)

39%

Mealtime practices

Always eat together as a family (7 nights per week)

57%

Never eat in front of TV (0 nights per week)

47%

Family eats most meals at table/bench (% who all or most of the time)

87%

Family eating policies (% who all or most of the time ...)

Ask child to eat everything on their plate at dinner

50%

Restrict dessert if child does not eat dinner

59%

Reward with dessert if child finishes dinner

29%

Only allow child to eat at set mealtimes

39%

Allow child to help him/herself to snacks

4%


* Excluding n = 17 (don't know or refused)

# Information collected from consent form

Wyse et al. BMC Public Health 2011 11:938   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-11-938

Open Data