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Open Access Research article

Cultural adaptation of the Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale (CUSES) in Ghana

Kwaku O Asante1 and Paul N Doku12*

Author Affiliations

1 Regent University College of Science and Technology, Department of Human Development and Psychology, City Campus, Dansoman, Ghana

2 Community Based Sciences, Section of Psychological Medicine, University of Glasgow, UK

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BMC Public Health 2010, 10:227  doi:10.1186/1471-2458-10-227

Published: 30 April 2010

Abstract

Background

Accurate assessment of self-reports of sexual behaviours is vital to the evaluation of HIV prevention and family planning interventions. This investigation was to determine the cross-cultural suitability of the Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale (CUSES) originally developed for American adolescents and young adults by examining the structure and psychometric properties.

Method

A self-administered cross-sectional survey of a convenient sample of 511 participants from a private university in Ghana with mean age 21.59 years.

Result

A Principal Component Analysis with varimax rotation identified a 14 item scale with four reliable factors labelled Appropriation (Cronbach alpha = .85), Assertive (Cronbach alpha = .90), Pleasure and Intoxicant (Cronbach alpha = .83), and STDs (Cronbach alpha = .81) that altogether explained 73.72% of the total variance. The scale correlated well with a measure of condom use at past sexual encounter (r = .73), indicating evidence of construct and discriminatory validity. The factor loadings were similar to the original CUSES scale but not identical suggesting relevant cultural variations.

Conclusion

The 14 item scale (CUSES-G) is a reliable and valid instrument for assessing condom use self efficacy. It is culturally appropriate for use among Ghanaian youth to gauge actual condom use and to evaluate interventions meant to increase condom use. Finally, the study cautioned researchers against the use of the original CUSES without validation in African settings and contexts.