Open Access Research article

Psychometric properties of the cardiac depression scale in patients with coronary heart disease

Litza A Kiropoulos123*, Ian Meredith45, Andrew Tonkin6, David Clarke7, Paul Antonis8 and Julie Plunkett8

Author Affiliations

1 Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010, Australia

2 Psychology Department, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, 3050, Australia

3 School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Monash Medical Centre, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia

4 MonashHeart, Monash Medical Centre, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia

5 Department of Medicine, Monash University, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia

6 Cardiovascular Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia

7 School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Monash Medical Centre, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia

8 MonashHeart and Cardiovascular Research Centre, Monash Medical Centre, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia

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BMC Psychiatry 2012, 12:216  doi:10.1186/1471-244X-12-216

Published: 3 December 2012

Abstract

Background

This study examined the psychometric properties of the Cardiac Depression Scale (CDS) in a sample of coronary heart disease (CHD) patients.

Methods

A total of 152 patients were diagnosed with coronary heart disease and were administered the CDS along with the Beck Depression Inventory- 2 (BDI-2) and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) 3.5-months after cardiac hospitalization.

Results

The CDS’s factorial composition in the current sample was similar to that observed in the original scale. Varimax-rotated principal-components analyses extracted six factors, corresponding to mood, anhedonia, cognition, fear, sleep and suicide. Reliability analyses yielded internal consistency α - coefficients for the six subscales ranging from 0.62 to 0.82. The CDS showed strong concurrent validity with the BDI-II (r = 0.64). More patients were classified as severely depressed using the CDS. Both the CDS and the BDI-2 displayed significantly strong correlations with the STAI (r = 0.61 and r = 0.64), respectively.

Conclusions

These findings encourage the use of the CDS for measuring the range of depressive symptoms in those with CHD 3.5 months after cardiac hospitalization.

Keywords:
Cardiac depression scale; Depression; Coronary heart disease; Validity; Reliability; Psychometric properties