Table 2

Mothers’ actions to help their husbands to quit smoking, at 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups (n = 1,483¶)
(%) Intervention Control OR (95% CI)
Have advised their husbands to quit smoking
     • 3-month† 441/696 (63.4%) 378/696 (54.3%) 1.46 (1.17, 1.80)***
     • 6-month‡ 354/682 (51.9%) 313/671 (46.6%) 1.23 (1.00, 1.53)*
     • 12-month‡ 312/667 (46.8%) 296/663 (44.6%) 1.09 (0.88, 1.35)
Have taken action(s) to help their husbands to quit smoking §
     • 3-month† 527/696 (75.7%) 451/696 (64.8%) 1.69 (1.34, 2.14)***
     • 6-month‡ 650/682 (66.0%) 330/671 (49.2%) 2.00 (1.61, 2.50)***
     • 12-month‡ 349/667 (52.3%) 268/663 (40.4%) 1.62 (1.30, 2.01)***

Notes: * p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.001.

† Mothers who did not take part in any follow-ups were assumed not to have taken any action to help their husbands to give up.

‡ Mothers who only responded one or two follow-ups were assumed to have the same responses as those of the previous follow-up (‘carry-forward method’).

§ Any of the following actions counted: (1) helping husbands to set a date for giving up; (2) putting up a ‘No Smoking’ sign at home; (3) asking their husbands to read a quit-smoking health education booklet tailor-made for this study; (4) advising them to seek help from healthcare professionals; (5) encouraging them to stop smoking so that their children will be healthier and less likely to become smokers in the future; and (6) discussing matters with them to understand their needs during the quitting process.

¶ Excluding mothers who reported their husbands had already stopped smoking. Proxy reports of fathers’ smoking status: at 3-month follow-up (91 stopped, 1,392 still smoking); at 6-month follow-up (130 stopped, 1,353 still smoking); at 12-month follow up (153 stopped, 1,330 still smoking).

Chan et al.

Chan et al. BMC Pediatrics 2013 13:50   doi:10.1186/1471-2431-13-50

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