Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Cancer and BioMed Central.

Open Access Research article

An evaluation of the integration of non-traditional learning tools into a community based breast and cervical cancer education program: The witness project of Buffalo

Thelma C Hurd1*, Paola Muti2, Deborah O Erwin3 and Sharita Womack2

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Surgery, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA

2 Department of Cancer Prevention, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA

3 University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Cancer 2003, 3:18  doi:10.1186/1471-2407-3-18

Published: 29 May 2003

Abstract

Background

Breast and cervical cancer continue to represent major health challenges for African American women. among Caucasian women. The underlying reasons for this disparity are multifactorial and include lack of education and awareness of screening and early detection. Traditional educational methods have enjoyed varied success in the African American community and spawned development of novel educational approaches. Community based education programs employing a variety of educational models have been introduced. Successful programs must train and provide lay community members with the tools necessary to deliver strong educational programs.

Methods

The Witness Project is a theory-based, breast and cervical cancer educational program, delivered by African American women, that stresses the importance of early detection and screening to improve survival and teaches women how to perform breast self examination. Implementing this program in the Buffalo Witness Project of Buffalo required several modifications in the curriculum, integration of non-traditional learning tools and focused training in clinical study participation. The educational approaches utilized included repetition, modeling, building comprehension, reinforcement, hands on learning, a social story on breast health for African American women, and role play conversations about breast and cervical health and support.

Results

Incorporating non-traditional educational approaches into the Witness Project training resulted in a 79% improvement in the number of women who mastered the didactic information. A seventy-two percent study participation rate was achieved by educating the community organizations that hosted Witness Project programs about the informed consent process and study participation.

Conclusion

Incorporating non-traditional educational approaches into community outreach programs increases training success as well as community participation.