Table 1

Aspirin use and lung cancer risk – summary of published studies.

Study (reference)

Year (place)

Design

Study sample

Key results


Peto et al.[17]

1988 (UK)

Randomized Trial

5139 British physicians: aspirin intervention group (n = 3429) vs. placebo group (n = 1710)

Lung cancer death rates lower in aspirin group (7.4/10.000 person years) vs. placebo group (11.6/10.000 person years)

Paganini-Hill et al.[18]

1989 (US)

Cohort study

13 987 retirement community residents; 111 lung cancer cases after 6.5 years of follow-up

No evidence of lower incidence of lung cancer among male daily aspirin users (RR = 1.35); Lower incidence of lung cancer among female daily aspirin users (RR = 0.29)

Thun et al.[19]

1993 (US)

Cohort study

Cancer Prevention Study II: 635,031 US residents; 6 year follow-up

No evidence of lower mortality from respiratory cancers in association with aspirin use among men; Lower respiratory cancer mortality among women using aspirin 1–15 times/month (RR = 0.73; 95 % CI 0.56–0.97)

Schreinemachers & Everson [14]

1994 (US)

Cohort study

NHANES I follow-up: 12,668 US residents; 189 respiratory cancers after 12.4 years (mean) of follow-up

Significantly lower incidence of lung cancer among men using aspirin in past 30 days (RR = 0.55; 95% CI 0.38–0.81); No evidence of lower lung cancer incidence among women using aspirin (RR = 1.40; 95% CI 0.74–2.66)

Rosenberg[20]

1995 (US)

Hospital-based case-control study

1110 lung cancer cases; 1181 cancer controls and 4906 non-cancer controls

Non-significant risk reduction associated with aspirin use when case group compared to cancer controls (RR = 0.80; 95% CI 0.60–1.20), but not apparent when compared to non-cancer controls (RR = 1.00; 95% CI 0.70–1.40)

Langman[21]

2000 (UK)

Record-linkage case control study

2560 lung cancer patients and 7643 controls identified from general practice research data base

Non-significant risk reduction associated with 7+ prescriptions of NSAIDs 1–3 years prior to diagnosis (OR = 0.84; 95% CI 0.69–1.02)

Akhmedkhanov et al.[22]

2002 (US)

Nested case-control study

81 female lung cancer patients and 808 controls selected from the NYU Women's Health Study

Non significant risk reduction between regular aspirin use and overall lung cancer (OR = 0.66; 95% CI 0.34–1.28); Significant risk reduction between regular use and non-small cell carcinoma of the lung (OR = 0.39; 95% CI 0.16–0.96)

Harris et al [23]

2002 (US)

Case-control study

489 lung cancer patients and 978 screening clinic controls (heavy smokers)

Significant risk reduction among daily aspirin users (OR = 0.32; 95% CI 0.23–0.44); effect seen among men and women

Current study

2002 (US)

Hospital-based case-control study

868 lung cancer cases and 935 hospital controls with non-neoplastic conditions

Significant risk reduction among regular aspirin users (OR = 0.57; 95% CI 0.41–0.78); effect seen among men and women


Moysich et al. BMC Cancer 2002 2:31   doi:10.1186/1471-2407-2-31

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