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Open Access Highly Accessed Case report

Oligodendroglioma of the ciliary body: a unique case report and the review of literature

Qing Guo12*, Jie Hao2, Shou bin Sun3, Shou ping Xu4, Qian Yang1, Qi liang Guo5 and Guo dong Cui6

Author Affiliations

1 Department of life and engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China

2 Department of Ophthalmology, the First Clinical Medical School of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China

3 Optometry Clinic, the Forth Clinical Medical School of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China

4 Department of General Surgery, the First Clinical Medical School of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China

5 Department of Ophthalmology, Fourth Hospital of Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province, Harbin, China

6 Department of Ophthalmology, the Fifth Clinical Medical School of Harbin Medical University, Daqing, China

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BMC Cancer 2010, 10:579  doi:10.1186/1471-2407-10-579

Published: 23 October 2010

Abstract

Background

To date, there is no report in the international literature of an oligodendroglioma of the ciliary body, nor is there an analysis of the possible origins of this lesion.

Case presentation

Here we report on a 52-year-old man admitted to our hospital with a ciliary body tumor revealed by clinical examination and ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies. Following enucleation, pathological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Postoperative histopathological staining results included OLIGO-2(+) and GFAP(-), leading to a pathological diagnosis of oligodendroglioma of the ciliary body in the right eye (WHO grade II).

Conclusions

Since malignant gliomas derive from transformed neural stem cells, the presence of oligodendroglioma in the ciliary body supports the hypothesis that gliomas can occur wherever neural stem cells exist. Tumors of the ciliary body derived from oligodendrocytes are difficult to diagnose; pathological analyses are essential.