Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Cancer and BioMed Central.

Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Long-term effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma ineligible for local ablation therapy or surgical resection. Stereotactic radiotherapy for liver cancer

Jung Hyun Kwon1, Si Hyun Bae1*, Ji Yoon Kim2, Byung Ock Choi2, Hong Seok Jang2, Jeong Won Jang1, Jong Young Choi1, Seung Kew Yoon1 and Kyu Won Chung1

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea

2 Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Cancer 2010, 10:475  doi:10.1186/1471-2407-10-475

Published: 3 September 2010

Abstract

Background

We evaluated the long-term effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ineligible for local therapy or surgery.

Methods

Forty-two HCC patients with tumors ≤ 100 cc and ineligible for local ablation therapy or surgical resection were treated with SBRT: 30-39 Gy with a prescription isodose range of 70-85% (median 80%) was delivered daily in three fractions. Median tumor volume was 15.4 cc (3.0-81.8) and median follow-up duration 28.7 months (8.4-49.1).

Results

Complete response (CR) for the in-field lesion was initially achieved in 59.6% and partial response (PR) in 26.2% of patients. Hepatic out-of-field progression occurred in 18 patients (42.9%) and distant metastasis developed in 12 (28.6%) patients. Overall in-field CR and overall CR were achieved in 59.6% and 33.3%, respectively. Overall 1-year and 3-year survival rates were 92.9% and 58.6%, respectively. In-field progression-free survival at 1 and 3 years was 72.0% and 67.5%, respectively. Patients with smaller tumor had better in-field progression-free survival and overall survival rates (<32 cc vs. ≥32 cc, P < 0.05). No major toxicity was encountered but one patient died with extrahepatic metastasis and radiation-induced hepatic failure.

Conclusions

SBRT is a promising noninvasive-treatment for small HCC that is ineligible for local treatment or surgical resection.