Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth and BioMed Central.

Open Access Research article

Post-partum trend in blood pressure levels, renal function and proteinuria in women with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia in Sub-Saharan Africa: A 6-months cohort study

Francois Folefack Kaze1*, Francis A Njukeng2, Andre-Pascal Kengne3, Gloria Ashuntantang4, Robinson Mbu5, Marie Patrice Halle6 and Tazoacha Asonganyi7

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences & University Teaching Hospital of Yaoundé, University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon

2 Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon

3 South African Medical Research Council & University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa

4 Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences & Yaoundé General Hospital, University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon

5 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences & Yaoundé Central Maternity, University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon

6 Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences & Douala General Hospital, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon

7 Department of Biochemistry and physiologic Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2014, 14:134  doi:10.1186/1471-2393-14-134

Published: 9 April 2014

Abstract

Background

Preeclampsia and eclampsia, which are the most frequent hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, are associated with renal involvements. We aimed to assess the time trend in blood pressure levels, renal function and proteinuria after delivery, and investigate their determinants in Cameroonian women with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia.

Methods

This was a prospective cohort study involving 54 women with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia, conducted between July 2010 and February 2012 at the central maternity unit of the Yaoundé Central Hospital. Clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded from day-1 to 6 months after delivery. Mixed-linear and logistic regression models were used to relate baseline and within follow-up levels of covariates, with changes in blood pressure levels, renal function and proteinuria, as well as persisting hypertension, renal failure and proteinuria.

Results

During follow-up, a significant improvement was observed in blood pressure, renal function and proteinuria (all p < 0.002). Thirteen (24.1%) patients with renal failure at delivery recovered completely within six weeks. Twenty-six (48.1%), 17 (31.5%) and 1 (1.8%) patients had persisting proteinuria at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months post-delivery, respectively. Corresponding figures for persisting hypertension were 23 (42.6%), 15 (27.8%) and 8 (14.8%). Advanced age, higher body mass index, low gestational age at delivery, low fetal birth weight, and proteinuria at delivery were the main risk factors for persisting hypertension at 3 months, meanwhile low fetal birth weight, severe preeclampsia and proteinuria at delivery were correlated with persisting proteinuria at 3 months. Advanced age and higher body mass index were the only determinants of the composite outcome of persisting hypertension or proteinuria at three and six months.

Conclusion

Hypertension and proteinuria are very common beyond the postpartum period in Cameroonian women with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia. Long-term follow-up of these women will help preventing and controlling related complications.

Keywords:
Preeclampsia; Eclampsia; Hypertension; Proteinuria