Open Access Research article

Impact of urinary incontinence on health-related quality of life, daily activities, and healthcare resource utilization in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity

Derek H Tang1*, Danielle Colayco2, James Piercy3, Vaishali Patel2, Denise Globe2 and Michael B Chancellor4

Author Affiliations

1 The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, 1295 N. Martin, PO Box 210202, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA

2 Department of Global Health Outcomes Strategy and Research, Allergan Inc, 2525 Dupont Drive, Irvine, CA 92612, USA

3 Adelphi Real World, Adelphi Mill, Grimshaw Lane, Bollington SK10 5JB, UK

4 Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Neurourology Program, Beaumont Hospital, 3535 West 13 Mile Road, Royal Oak, MI 48073, USA

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BMC Neurology 2014, 14:74  doi:10.1186/1471-2377-14-74

Published: 4 April 2014

Abstract

Background

Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) leads to impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL), productivity, and greater healthcare resource burden. The humanistic and economic burden may be more apparent in NDO patients with urinary incontinence (UI). The objective of this study was to compare the HRQoL, productivity, and health resource use (HRU) between continent and incontinent NDO patients.

Methods

A retrospective database analysis was conducted using the Adelphi Overactive Bladder (OAB)/UI Disease Specific Programme, a multi-national, cross-sectional survey reported from both patients’ and physicians’ perspectives. The population for this analysis included NDO patients with or without UI. General and disease-specific HRQoL were assessed using the EuroQoL-5D (EQ-5D), Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire (I-QOL), and the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q). Productivity and daily activity impairment were measured using the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire. HRU indicators included OAB-related surgery, OAB-related hospitalizations, incontinence pad usage, switching anticholinergics used for OAB due to inadequate response or adverse effects, and OAB-related physician visits. Bivariate analyses, multivariate ordinary least squares (OLS) regression analyses and published minimal clinically important differences (MCID) were used to assess relationships between incontinent status and the aforementioned outcome measures.

Results

A total of 324 NDO patients with or without urinary incontinence were included, averaging 54 years of age (SD 16), of whom 43.8 percent were male. Bivariate analyses detected no significant relationship between incontinent status and HRU variables. Regression analyses revealed that incontinent patients had clinically and statistically lower disease-specific HRQoL and greater impairment in daily activities as compared to continent patients. On average, incontinent patients scored 10 points lower on the I-QOL total score, 9 points lower on the OAB-q HRQoL score, 15 points higher on OAB-q symptom severity, and experienced 8.2 percent higher activity impairment due to their bladder condition (all p < 0.001).

Conclusions

Incontinent NDO patients experience significantly lower HRQoL and activity impairment as compared to continent NDO patients.

Keywords:
Neurogenic detrusor overactivity; Incontinence; Burden of illness; Quality of life; Productivity