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Open Access Correction

Correction: Determinants of the creatinine clearance to glomerular filtration rate ratio in patients with chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional study

Yen-chung Lin123*, Nisha Bansal3, Eric Vittinghoff4, Alan S Go45 and Chi-yuan Hsu3

Author Affiliations

1 Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

2 Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

3 Division of Nephrology, School of Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

4 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

5 Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA

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BMC Nephrology 2014, 15:85  doi:10.1186/1471-2369-15-85

Published: 6 June 2014

Abstract

After the publication of our paper Lin et al. “Determinants of the creatinine clearance to glomerular filtration rate ratio in patients with chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional study” BMC Nephrology 2013, 14:268, we became aware of errors in the manuscript arising from to a misunderstanding of serum creatinine calibration in the released Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study data obtained from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Data Repository. Specifically further multiplication by 0.95 was actually not necessary to arrive at the standardized creatinine values.

Here we present the revised results of the re-analyses along with revisions of the relevant tables. Mean CrCl/iGFR ratio should be 1.13 ± 0.46 instead of 1.19 ± 0.48. The main conclusion of the paper remain unchanged: “Contrary to what had been suggested by prior smaller studies, CrCl/GFR ratio does not vary with degree of proteinuria or race/ethnicity. The ratio is also closer to 1.0 than reported by several frequently cited reports in the literature.”