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Open Access Research article

The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and cancer risk: a meta-analysis

Yonggang Zhang12, Jie He12, Yao Deng23, Jie Zhang4, Xiaobo Li15, Zhangpeng Xiang2, Honglang Huang2, Can Tian1, Jin Huang2 and Hong Fan12*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041, China

2 West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041, China

3 Department of Laboratory Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China

4 Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medicine, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, 325035, China

5 Department of Respiratory Medicine, The 452nd Military Hospital of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China

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BMC Medical Genetics 2011, 12:159  doi:10.1186/1471-2350-12-159

Published: 12 December 2011

Abstract

Background

The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been implicated in susceptibility to cancer, but a large number of studies have reported inconclusive results. The aim of this study is to assess the association between the I/D polymorphism in the ACE gene and cancer risk by meta-analysis.

Methods

A search was performed in Pubmed database, Embase database, Chinese Biomedical (CBM) database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database and Weipu database, covering all studies until August 31, 2010. Statistical analysis was performed by using Revman4.2 and STATA 10.0.

Results

A total of 25 case-control studies comprising 3914 cancer patients and 11391 controls were identified. No significant association was found between the I/D polymorphism and over all cancer risks (OR = 0.88, 95%CI = 0.73-1.06, P = 0.17 for DD+DI vs. II). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, no significant association was found among Asians and Europeans for the comparison of DD+DI vs. II. In the subgroup analysis by cancer types, no significant associations were found among lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer for the comparison of DD+DI vs. II. Results from other comparative genetic models also indicated the lack of associations between this polymorphism and cancer risks.

Conclusions

This meta-analysis suggested that the ACE D/I polymorphism might not contribute to the risk of cancer.

Keywords:
Angiotensin-converting enzyme; cancer; meta-analysis; polymorphism; risk